Marianne Williamson falls for fake news story about Trump pardoning Charles Manson

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Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson got slammed on social media after she apparently fell for a fake news story Sunday night that claimed President Trump pardoned Charles Manson, the murderous cult leader who died in 2017.

"There is something deeply sinister about Trump pardoning Charles Manson, even posthumously," she wrote to her 2.8 million Twitter followers. "Dog whistles of the very worst possible kind…"

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON: I'M NOT SOME 'CRYSTAL WOO-WOO LADY' PEOPLE ON THE 'LEFT' SAY I AM

The self-help author, who's running a longshot candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, later deleted the tweet and admitted the information was erroneous in a follow-up tweet. “Glad To have been wrong," Williamson wrote in a tweet that she also subsequently deleted.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON EXPLAINS DELETED DORIAN TWEET, GIVES ODD EXPLANATION FOR WHY SHE'S NOT 'ANTI-SCIENCE'

Marianne Williamson appeared to have fallen for a satirical news story Sunday night, tweeting there was "something deeply sinister" about President Trump pardoning murderer Charles Manson.

Marianne Williamson appeared to have fallen for a satirical news story Sunday night, tweeting there was "something deeply sinister" about President Trump pardoning murderer Charles Manson.

According to fact-checking website Snopes.com, the story about Trump and Manson is satirical and stems from a phony article published on Nov. 16 by MoronMajority.com. It was then picked up by political website the Daily Kos, which didn't label the article satire, and it seems Williamson picked up on it over the weekend.

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Manson died in November 2017 at 83 after suffering a heart attack and respiratory failure, triggered by colon cancer that had spread to other areas of his body. He had been serving a life sentence for orchestrating the 1969 killings of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and eight other people.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

John Delaney, Marianne Williamson criticize rivals over health-care plans

closeDelaney: The loudest voices in the Democratic Party are getting the most coverage for nowVideo

Delaney: The loudest voices in the Democratic Party are getting the most coverage for now

Democratic presidential candidate John Delaney on the divide within the Democratic Party.

CONCORD, N.H. – Two of the longer-shots for the Democratic presidential nomination are taking aim at some of their middle and top-tier rivals over their health-care proposals.

Former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland, a centrist candidate who’s long been vocal in his opposition to a government-run “Medicare-for-all” health-care system proposed by Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and supported by Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, once again criticized the two progressive standard-bearers among the large field of Democrats seeking the White House.

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“You’ve got Senator Sanders and Senator Warren who want to cause complete upheaval to the U.S. health-care system as a way of creating universal health care,” Delaney told reporters on Monday after filing at the New Hampshire secretary of state’s office to place his name on the first-in-the-nation presidential primary ballot.

Delaney charged that “they’re going to basically blow up 90 percent of the health-care system to try to solve 10 percent.”

He also criticized the public-option plans being promoted by more moderate contenders Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, arguing, “It will almost do nothing to improve the health situation in the United States of America. It’s simply a government-run insurance company and it’s not even clear the government will run it that well.”

Delaney promoted his own proposal, which he said would reach universal coverage without forcing millions of Americans off their current health insurance.

Marianne Williamson filing to place her name on the New Hampshire presidential primary ballot, in Concord on Monday.

Marianne Williamson filing to place her name on the New Hampshire presidential primary ballot, in Concord on Monday. (Fox News)

Best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson, who pledged to unveil her own health-care plan in the next week or two, agreed with Warren and Sanders on moving toward universal coverage. But, she emphasized, “The problem I have with their plans, however, is, I do want doctors to have some entrepreneurial possibilities.”

Criticizing Buttigieg and Klobuchar, Williamson said, “Pete and Amy, that’s another cover for same old, same old.”

Health care has been a top issue for voters in the Democrats’ race for the presidential nomination. There’s been a sharp divide between the progressive contenders supporting “Medicare-for-all” and the candidates seeking to strengthen the current health-care system by adding a public option.

Williamson also seemed to question the moral leadership of her rivals for the nomination, highlighting, “They have a different set of qualifications… In terms of moral leadership, articulating a moral vision for groups of people and actually navigating the turbulence of the kind of crisis within people and within systems that is necessary now in a leader, I’m the one who’s had 35 years of experience.”

Asked by Fox News if she had the campaign cash to continue until February, when the presidential nominating contests kick off, Williamson said, “I have… money to continue. I do not have the money that I need to get on television in the way that I need to get on television. Hopefully that will come.”

Williamson also elicited laughter from the several dozen supporters who accompanied her to the filing, saying, “You see all these wonderful people who are here to support the campaign. The whole point of a grassroots campaign is that the volunteers need to work harder.”

Williamson, who has preached the politics of love and proposed creating a Cabinet-level Department of Peace if elected, urged her followers to be “obnoxious.”

“One of the things that you certainly saw and continue to see in Trump’s supporters is rambunctiousness. Rambunctiousness should not only be on the right,” she said. “This starts now. It’s like a bell ringing at the beginning of a race. I signed that document and let’s go. That means everybody has to be obnoxious on my behalf.”

Delaney, who been running for the White House for over two years — he launched his campaign in July 2017, just six months into Donald Trump’s presidency — acknowledged, “We would have liked to be doing better in the polls, but to me, the only kind of poll that matters is the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary.”

He also told Fox News, “I’m absolutely going to support the Democratic nominee. Full stop.” And, he said there was “zero” chance he’d run as a third-party candidate.

Delaney, a multi-millionaire who made his fortune as a CEO on Wall Street in the health care industry, has poured millions of his own money into his campaign. The candidate, joined by his wife, April, and a few supporters as he filed, indicated once again he had no intention of dropping out even though he hasn’t qualified for any of the Autumn debates.

Asked by Fox News about his expectations for where he needs to finish in Iowa and New Hampshire, he optimistically said a “top 5 in one of these states sends a big message.”

Original Article

Marianne Williamson isn’t dropping campaign after rivals’ lackluster debate and show of ‘faux democracy’

closeMarianne Williamson: 'The system is even more corrupt than I knew'Video

Marianne Williamson: 'The system is even more corrupt than I knew'

2020 Presidential hopeful and author Marianne Williamson discusses what she's learned from running for president.

Democratic presidential hopeful Marianne Williamson said "everyone had a bad night" at Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate, and the candidates' lackluster performances in front of the American people are why she isn't dropping out of the race.

In an op-ed she wrote for The Washington Post on Wednesday, Williamson — she failed to meet the criteria to take part in the fourth-round debate — said the event "was a lot of things, but it was not exciting."

"If anything, it reduced some very nice people to behavior their mothers probably raised them not to engage in," Williamson wrote. "Which woman who claims feminist ideals can be the nastiest to another woman? Which young person can show the greatest arrogance toward those with decades of experience under their belts? Which intelligent person can best reduce a complicated topic to pabulum for the masses?"

She sarcastically accused the candidates of enlisting the "brilliant" strategy of engaging the public "by showing them the worst of who we are."

Marianne Williamson calls the left 'mean' amid attacks on Trump from HollywoodVideo

The wellness author and spiritual guru acknowledged that she wasn't on stage last night, and she pointed a finger at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) for narrowing the field of candidates "at the very moment when it should be opening up."

"Placing a political straitjacket on our primary system, controlling the process via money and ridiculous rules, the party is risking disaster," Williamson wrote, and that "making sure [the debate contains] only its preordained category of people, discussing its preordained category of topics, [and] is placed before the American people for consideration as contenders for the nomination to run against President Trump — has created a false, inauthentic piece of high school theater posing as the Democratic debates."

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON: 'THE SYSTEM IS EVEN MORE CORRUPT THAN I KNEW'

"This," she wrote,"would all be funny if it weren’t so dangerous."

"For reasons not easy to detect, the Democrats are held to a higher standard by the American people — who, despite a bad rap and a few spectacular failures, are usually good at smelling a rat. Try as they might to throw people off the scent, the DNC and its media pals are creating the stench of inauthenticity at exactly the moment when some blazing truths should be shining through."

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON: I'M NOT SOME 'CRYSTAL WOO-WOO LADY' PEOPLE ON THE 'LEFT' SAY I AM

Williamson said political insiders are parading around a "repackaged" democratic process that she called a "faux democracy."

When she asked herself a question in the third person about whether or not it's time for her to drop out, Williamson wrote: "After that debate Tuesday night, are you kidding?"

"Let me get this right. You think a sanitized wish list of Democratic proposals, focused just enough on appealing to people’s self-interest but not going anywhere near a serious discussion of what ails us, is going to defeat the Republicans? You think your 2016 redux, containing no hint of self-reflection on what created the disaster last time, is going to fight off the specter of neo-fascism? Well, I don't," she wrote.

"If our political gatekeepers keep locking the gate, then the people ourselves will unlock it."

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Original Article

Marianne Williamson says liberals are ‘mean’ and lie: ‘I thought the right did that’

close Marianne Williamson unveils proposal to create a Department of Peace Video

Marianne Williamson unveils proposal to create a Department of Peace

Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson says, if elected, she will work with Congress to create a Cabinet-level department dedicated to making the world a safer place.

Longshot Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson suggested in a new interview that she was surprised to find liberals are "so mean" and even lie — lashing out at the party's treatment of her spiritually tinged campaign.

Williamson sat down with New Yorker editor David Remnick for a wide-ranging podcast conversation, in which she also denied being an anti-vaxxer. She was asked about her plan to take on President Trump with kindness and the politics of "love," as well as the reception her campaign has gotten.

“I know this sounds naïve,” Williamson said. “I didn’t think the left was so mean. I didn’t think the left lied like this. I thought the right did that, I thought we were better.”

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON SAYS 'POWERFUL FORCES' ON THE LEFT OUT TO END PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

“I didn’t think the left was so mean. I didn’t think the left lied like this. I thought the right did that, I thought we were better.”

— Marianne Williamson

Williamson said “the haters in this country have been collectivized for political purpose” and added that liberal New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof would have been her ideal secretary of state before he condemned her candidacy.

“But then I read that he can’t stand me, so he probably wouldn’t want to work for me,” Williamson said.

Williamson also told The New Yorker that she is “not an anti-vaxxer” and admitted that vaccinations “save lives,” saying a “sloppy comment” resulted in her being labeled as an anti-vaxxer, which put a target on her for social media mockery.

WILLIAMSON DENIES SHE'S 'CRAZY' AFTER DELETING TWEET ABOUT 'POWER OF THE MIND' IMPACTING HURRICANE DORIAN'S PATH

“I said that they were draconian. I said that they were Orwellian,” she said. “I would not say that [now]. It was a sloppy comment that a presidential candidate should not have said.”

At one point during the freewheeling interview, Williamson oddly said that Trump’s facial features have changed over the years but declined to elaborate.

“If you look at interviews with [Trump] from the 80s… he even looked different, which gives me my own theories about what’s involved in all this. When you see features on someone’s face change that much. I’ll leave it at that,” she said.

Remnick asked, “Not just aging?”

Williamson then told Remnick to “research” and he quickly asked what she meant.

“I don’t want to go into that. It’s just that there are a lot of people who find a lot very curious about the president,” Williamson said. “I’m not running on a campaign of personal demonization, personal attacks. I can keep it to conversations about the president’s policies.”

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The spiritual author-turned-presidential hopeful has called for a "Department of Peace" to spur peace initiatives domestically and abroad. Williamson also fought back when she was criticized this week after a reporter tweeted a screenshot of her appearing to attribute Hurricane Dorian's changed path to the "creative use of the power of the mind."

"Millions of us seeing Dorian turn away from land is not a wacky idea," she said in a now-deleted tweet. "It is a creative use of the power of the mind. Two minutes prayer, visualization, meditation for those in the way of the storm."

Reporter Yashar Ali tweeted that post and Williamson promptly accused him of trying to "debunk, counter or mischaracterize anything I do."

In another tweet, Williamson seemed to deny that she claimed that "power of the mind" affected Hurricane Dorian's path.

Fox News’ Louis Casiano and Sam Dorman contributed to this report.

Read moreMarianne Williamson says liberals are ‘mean’ and lie: ‘I thought the right did that’

Marianne Williamson announces plan to create ‘Department of Peace’

close Williamson: We will begin by taking the picture of Andrew Jackson out of the Oval Office Video

Williamson: We will begin by taking the picture of Andrew Jackson out of the Oval Office

2020 Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson speaks to a crowd at the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum.

Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson on Monday unveiled details of her plan to create a peace-building agency to focus on ending violence following decades of U.S. military conflict and an uptick in mass shootings.

In her announcement, the spiritual author called for a "Department of Peace" to spur peace initiatives domestically and abroad.

“I believe our country’s way of dealing with security issues is increasingly obsolete," Williamson said in a statement. "We have the finest military force in the world, however, we can no longer rely on force to rid ourselves of international enemies."

Marianne Williamson, seen here speaking Monday in Iowa, announced details in her plane to crate a "Department of Peace." (Tim Hynds/Sioux City Journal via AP)

Marianne Williamson, seen here speaking Monday in Iowa, announced details in her plane to crate a "Department of Peace." (Tim Hynds/Sioux City Journal via AP)

WILLIAMSON VOWS TO RESCIND MILITARY MEDALS, REMOVE ANDREW JACKSON'S OVAL OFFICE PORTRAIT IN ‘ATONEMENT’ FOR NATIVE AMERICAN TREATMENT

"The planet has become too small for that, and in so doing, we overburden our military by asking them to compensate for the other work that we choose not to do, and we are less effective, and less secure, because of our choices," she added.
The main duties of the proposed agency would be promoting justice and democratic principles, she said, expanding human rights, working to avert armed conflict, ending gun violence, addressing white supremacy and promoting conflict mediation and resolution.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON SAYS 'POWERFUL FORCES' ON THE LEFT OUT TO END PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

Specifically, the department would work with local, state governments to decrease gun violence, rehabilitate prisoners, examine how food supply affects behavior and trying to end the school-to-prison pipeline. Abroad, Williamson wants to help governments end conflicts without providing U.S. military assistance and providing and coordinating humanitarian relief.

The plan calls for the cabinet's secretary to serve on the National Security Council and would have power to coordinate with other agencies — including the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Defense, Education, Justice, and State, and the new U.S. Department of Children and Youth.

Is Marianne Williamson's message of 'harnessing love' resonating with voters? Video

The department also would create a peace academy that would offer a four-year concentration in peace education. The academy would be modeled after the military service academies and graduates would be required to serve five years in public service programs focused on domestic and international conflict resolution.

Funding for the agency would come from various peace-building and violence-reduction efforts within the federal government.

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"As the Department [of Peace] becomes effective in its work, a true 'peace dividend,' reflecting a declining domestic and international need for the instruments of violence, will more than fund the costs of the Department’s activities," Williamson said.

Last month, Williamson criticized the U.S. budget for peace-building agencies, which she said gets $1 billion of the $40 billion given to the State Department. Throughout her campaign, she has vowed to defeat President Trump with a politics of "love."

Fox News' Patrick Ward contributed to this report.

Original Article

Williamson vows to rescind military medals, remove Andrew Jackson’s Oval Office portrait in ‘atonement’ for Native American treatment

close Williamson: We will begin by taking the picture of Andrew Jackson out of the Oval Office Video

Williamson: We will begin by taking the picture of Andrew Jackson out of the Oval Office

2020 Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson speaks to a crowd at the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum.

Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson, calling for a national "atonement" over the treatment of Native Americans, vowed Monday to rescind medals of honor for those who fought against them and even take down President Andrew Jackson's portrait from the Oval Office if she's elected.

The spiritual author, who has gained a devoted following in recent weeks for her memorable debate performances, called for a “new era of American history” with Native Americans during an appearance at the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON SAYS 'POWERFUL FORCES' ON THE LEFT OUT TO END PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

"We can atone. We can make amends," Williamson said. "And if and when I'm president of the United States, we will. We will begin by taking that picture of Andrew Jackson off the wall of the Oval Office."

Jackson’s presidency was notoriously marked by the signing of the Indian Removal Act, which resulted in violent conflicts between Native Americans and the U.S. government amid the relocation of thousands of Native Americans.

Williamson called the portrait "one of the greatest insults."

She then took aim at another symbol from that historic period, vowing to withdraw military medals of honor for those who fought against Native Americans.

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Williamson has been in the bottom tier of 2020 candidates in recent polling, but nevertheless has built a national profile in the wake of viral debate performances. The self-help author cautioned the other candidates at the last debate that “wonkiness” would not stop the "collectivized hatred" of the president and would lead to “very dark days” for Democrats.

At Monday's forum, Williamson stopped short of calling for financial reparations, which she supports for slavery. She called Native American history a "more complicated situation" than one that can be fixed with such a measure. She suggested the U.S. look to how Germany reconciled with Jews in the aftermath of the Holocaust as "a template of our national repair" that could be used to make amends with Native Americans.

The presidential hopeful stated that children must forever be educated about how the U.S. treated Native Americans and suggested a year-long reconciliation program between the two peoples.

“It is time for us to do some very important, deep, and powerful repair work,” she concluded.

Original Article

Marianne Williamson says ‘powerful forces’ on the left out to end presidential campaign

closeDemocratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson compares immigration raids to Nazi GermanyVideo

Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson compares immigration raids to Nazi Germany

Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz reacts to controversial comments from the 2020 candidate and Rep. Ocasio-Cortez on 'The Story.'

Insurgent Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson claims that “powerful forces” on the left are to keep her away from the third Democratic debate next month with smears.

Williamson is a self-help author who captured the attention of potential voters with her spiritual performances during the first two Democratic debates, becoming the most Googled candidate even as she was speaking fewer minutes than other candidates.

Yet with her rising popularity, her candidacy and views have come under the spotlight, resulting in a number of damaging stories about her previous remarks about spirituality, medicine and science.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON DEFENDS PAST STATEMENTS ABOUT ANTIDEPRESSANTS IN CONTENTIOUS CNN INTERVIEW

She came under fire after her remark that the clinical depression diagnosis was a “scam” surfaced. She apologized for the comment earlier this month.

She also once posted a Twitter message after actor Robin Williams’ death, suggesting it was related to the use of antidepressants. The tweet linked to an article written by an organization funded by the Church of Scientology, which doesn’t believe in psychiatry.

But Williamson fired back at the attacks and told the Daily Mail that it’s part of a “well-strategized effort to smear me. There's no doubt about that.”

“It's very frustrating because I like to think on the left we don't do things like that. So it's been a bit of a wake-up call,” she continued. “But apparently there's some very powerful forces that want to make sure I'm not in that third debate so I must be doing something right if they've worked so hard to create that.”

“But apparently there's some very powerful forces that want to make sure I'm not in that third debate so I must be doing something right if they've worked so hard to create that.”

— Marianne Williamson

The Democrat dismissed the attacks as smears, saying “these words are anti-science, anti-medicine. She’s crazy. She’s dangerous… It's a mischaracterization.”

The attacks so far haven’t deterred her from continuing to seek the highest office in the country. “I'm in it. And as long as my heart says I'm in it, I'm it,” she told the outlet.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON: TRUMP 'FANNED FLAMES' OF WHITE SUPREMACY, BUT 'UNFAIR' TO SAY HE IS DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR EL PASO, DAYTON SHOOTINGS

As an immediate campaign goal, Williamson, who despite the online support has languished in polls at around 1 percent, is trying to get on the third Democratic debate next month. To do so, she needs to register at least 2 percent support in four polls in addition to 130,000 unique donors to her campaign.

“I'm almost at the point of the donors needed and we'll find out in the next week or so whether I've made it in that 2 percent in those polls and how much effect those two debates have had,” told the Daily Mail.

At the Iowa State Fair on Friday, a must-go event for political candidates, she also decried some of the attacks against her as “an ancient strain of misogyny.”

Is Marianne Williamson right about the US health care system?Video

“I've heard things said about me, for which there is absolutely no evidence, no truth and things about what there's plenty of evidence to the contrary,” she said, adding that some stories about her came “from websites and tweets that on the level of the National Enquirer.”

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“It’s obviously a well-strategized intentional smear,” she added. 'The talking points are obvious. The words are anti-science, anti-medicine. She’s crazy. She’s dangerous. She’s a grifter.

“The talking points are obvious. And I have to tell you something – there’s an ancient strain of misogyny which says about any woman that doesn’t toe the line that is the status quo to just back up. She’s scary. She’s dangerous.”

Original Article

Marianne Williamson defends hiring ex-Sanders staffer accused of forcibly kissing subordinate

closeIs Marianne Williamson right about the US health care system?Video

Is Marianne Williamson right about the US health care system?

Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson says Americans have 'sickness care' rather than a health care.

Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Marianne Williamson on Friday defended hiring a former Bernie Sanders staffer to head her Iowa campaign even though he was accused by a subordinate of sexual assault in 2016.

Robert Becker served as Sanders’ Iowa caucus director in 2016 and would likely have worked on his 2020 campaign, Politico reported. Instead, he was ousted from Sanders’ team earlier this year after a much younger staffer who worked underneath him alleged he forcibly kissed her on the last night of the Democratic National Convention and put his tongue in her mouth, according to Politico.

The woman also claimed Becker said he had always wanted to have sex with her and made other lewd references, which Politico reported others corroborated.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON: TRUMP 'FANNED FLAMES' OF WHITE SUPREMACY, BUT 'UNFAIR' TO SAY HE IS DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR EL PASO, DAYTON SHOOTINGS

Robert Becker, who was the Iowa state director for Sen. Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential bid, has been accused of forcibly kissing a younger female subordinate during the campaign. (Getty Images)

Robert Becker, who was the Iowa state director for Sen. Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential bid, has been accused of forcibly kissing a younger female subordinate during the campaign. (Getty Images)

But Williamson said she was willing to look past the allegations against Becker.

“I believe in forgiveness. I believe in redemption. I believe in people rising up after they’ve fallen down,” Williamson said. “I had not read anything or heard anything that made me feel this was a man who never deserved to work again.”

“I believe in forgiveness. I believe in redemption. I believe in people rising up after they’ve fallen down. I had not read anything or heard anything that made me feel this was a man who never deserved to work again.”

— Marianne Williamson, Democrat running for president

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Becker “categorically” denies the accusations and said he remembered the night was filled with “hugs and kisses," Politico reported.

The Sanders campaign in 2016 was rocked by numerous complaints of sexual harassment by members of the staff. In January, Sanders wrote an apology said his campaign staffers' standards for personal conduct should have been higher.

"The allegations speak to unacceptable behavior that must not be tolerated in any campaign or any workplace," Sanders wrote in a statement.

Original Article