Rudy Giuliani raises eyebrows after calling himself ‘Former Attorney General of the United States’ on Facebook page

closeGiuliani admits to forcing out YovanovitchVideo

Giuliani admits to forcing out Yovanovitch

Rudy Giuliani, President Trump’s personal attorney, reveals why he was in Ukraine on ‘The Ingraham Angle.’

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani had critics scratching their heads on Tuesday after publicizing his Facebook page, where he referred to himself as a "Former Attorney General of the United States."

Giuliani, who has made headlines in recent months over his involvement with the Ukraine scandal as President Trump's personal attorney, plugged his Facebook page on Tuesday and teased users about findings from his "investigation."

"Connect with me on my Facebook Page. More to come on my investigation, soon!" Giuliani tweeted with a link to the page, which was created in October.

In addition to the erroneous listing, Giuliani is also described as a "government official" despite his current role as the president's personal lawyer.

Giuliani makes key admissionVideo

Giuliani's LinkedIn page correctly states that he was a U.S. Associate Attorney General between February 1981 and June 1983 under former President Ronald Reagan. He then spent five-and-a-half years as the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, leaving that position on New Year's Day, 1989.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Giuliani made headlines earlier this month when he traveled to Ukraine in the hope of gathering evidence against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden over their ties to natural gas company Burisma Holdings.

In a recent interview, Giuliani admitted to playing a key role in the ousting of ex-U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, insisting she was "corrupt."

Original Article

Former Hawaii governor calls for Tulsi Gabbard to resign over missed House votes

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 23Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 23

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 22 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Former Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie called on Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, to resign Monday, telling reporters that her congressional district deserves to be "fully represented."

Abercrombie, a Democrat who also spent nearly 20 years in the House of Representatives, told reporters that he found Gabbard's multiple missed votes on the House floor due to her ongoing 2020 presidential bid unacceptable. He specifically cited Gabbard's recent missed vote on an omnibus spending bill, as well as her "present" vote on President Trump's impeachment.

According to the website govtrack.us, Gabbard missed 88.7% of the 141 House votes taken in the past three months.

Gabbard voted "present" on both articles of impeachment — the only lawmaker to do so. All Republicans and two Democrats — including one who has since switched parties to the GOP — voted against the articles.

GABBARD BREAKS WITH DEMS, VOTES 'PRESENT' ON BOTH ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT

Meghan McCain praises Tulsi Gabbard for voting 'present' on impeachmentVideo

"Throughout my life, whether through serving in the military or in Congress, I’ve always worked to do what is in the best interests of our country. Not what’s best for me politically or what’s best for my political party," Gabbard said last week. "After doing my due diligence in reviewing the 658-page impeachment report, I came to the conclusion that I could not in good conscience vote either yes or no."

She previously announced she will not be running for reelection in 2020, choosing instead to focus on her White House bid. She posted a video in October announcing the move and expressing gratitude to the people of her district.

At his press conference, Abercrombie said Gabbard must resign her seat “the sooner the better” because “she’s missing votes on almost everything."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The former governor is also the campaign co-chairman for Hawaii State Sen. Kai Kahele of Hilo, a Democrat seeking to succeed Gabbard next November. The district, which covers the entire state except for urban Honolulu, has never elected a Republican.

Rep. Ed Case, D-Hawaii, the state's other U.S. representative, voted in favor of impeaching Trump.

A Gabbard representative didn’t immediately respond to messages from the Associated Press on Abercrombie's call for her resignation.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin criticized for comments on pardon of convicted child rapist

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 20Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 20

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 20 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Former Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin defended his pardon of a man found guilty of raping a 9-year-old child, saying the conviction was not based on physical evidence.

Micah Schoettle was in the second year of a 23-year sentence when Bevin controversially pardoned him of rape, sodomy and other sexual crimes last week.

"There was zero evidence," Bevin said during a 17-minute radio interview with talk show host Terry Meiners on Thursday, according to The Courier-Journal.

He noted the girl's sister was in the room during the alleged incident and denied the sexual assaults occured.

"Both their hymens were intact," he added. "This is perhaps more specific than people would want, but trust me. If you have been repeatedly sexually violated as a small child by an adult, there are going to be repercussions of that physically and medically."

KENTUCKY REPUBLICAN GOV. MATT BEVIN CONCEDES TO DEM ANDY BESHEAR IN REELECTION BID

In this Nov. 4, 2019, file photo, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin looks out at the crowd during a campaign rally with President Donald Trump in Lexington, Ky. Bevin, who lost to Democrat Andy Beshear last month in a close race, is being criticized for comments he made during a Thursday radio interview about pardoning a man convicted of raping a young child. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

In this Nov. 4, 2019, file photo, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin looks out at the crowd during a campaign rally with President Donald Trump in Lexington, Ky. Bevin, who lost to Democrat Andy Beshear last month in a close race, is being criticized for comments he made during a Thursday radio interview about pardoning a man convicted of raping a young child. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

Prosecutors opposed to the pardon blasted Bevin for his comments on the case.

“He obviously did not do any research on this matter or he would know that only 2 percent of sexual assault victims show any visible physical injury as a result of the rapes that they’ve suffered,” said Rob Sanders, prosecutor in Kenton County who put Schoettle away. “This is the kind of foolish ignorance that prosecutors have been working for decades to overcome.”

Kentucky's former chief medical examiner Dr. George Nichols said Bevin's comments were factually inaccurate.

Gov. Matt Bevin says Kentucky voters are outraged by impeachment 'charade'Video

KENTUCKY GOV. MATT BEVIN RAISES VOTER-FRAUD CONCERNS AS UNOFFICIAL TALLY HAS HIM TRAILING BY 5,000 VOTES

“Rape is not proved by hymen penetration,” he told the newspaper. “Rape is proved by phallic penetration … where the vaginal lips meet the outer surface of the vagina."

“He not only doesn’t know the law, in my humble opinion, he clearly doesn’t know medicine and anatomy,” he added.

Bevin, a Republican, pardoned 428 people, including some violent offenders, between when he lost his re-election bid on Nov. 5 and his final day in office on Dec. 9. The pardons have prompted an investigation by Sanders' office.

Bevin concedes to Beshear in Kentucky governor's raceVideo

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The probe is expected to look into whether Schoettle's pardon is connected to his family's wealth and political connections.

Several of Bevin's other pardons have also drawn rebuke. The pardon of Patrick Baker, who was convicted of murder and other crimes, was also criticized. His family held a political fundraiser for Bevin last year that raised $21,500. Two others charged alongside Baker for the murder of Donald Mills are still in prison.

Fox News' Morgan Phillips and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Obama’s former doc says Biden ‘not a healthy guy’ after reviewing medical info: Report

closeCould Biden take 2020 if he promised to only serve one term?Video

Could Biden take 2020 if he promised to only serve one term?

'The Daily Briefing' host Dana Perino reacts to the Biden campaign's bold strategy.

One of President Obama's former doctors reportedly disputed a letter released by former Vice President Joe Biden's campaign in which the former vice president's own doctor praised the 77-year-old presidential candidate as a "healthy, vigorous" man.

“He’s not a healthy guy,” said Dr. David Scheiner, who previously served as Obama's physician. According to the Washington Examiner, Scheiner read Biden's medical history and said the presidential candidate "has a lot of issues."

“He’s not in bad shape for his age, but I wouldn't say he’s in outstanding health. Could I guarantee he won't have issues for the next four years? He has a lot of issues that are just sort of sitting there," Scheiner said.

Scheiner previously told the Examiner that Biden "looked frail" during the first Democratic primary debate. "I sort of got the feeling he wasn’t very strong. It was similar to the feeling I got when Republicans started attacking Mueller so fiercely," he said.

BIDEN CAMPAIGN RELEASES DOCTOR STATEMENT CALLING HIM 'HEALTHY, VIGOROUS 77-YEAR-OLD'

Dr. David Scheiner and former Vice President Joe Biden. (Getty/AP).

Dr. David Scheiner and former Vice President Joe Biden. (Getty/AP).

Questions about Biden’s health and age have repeatedly come up since even before the former vice president declared his candidacy in April. In September, Biden committed to publicly releasing his medical records before the Iowa caucuses, to try and put to rest concerns over whether he was fit enough to take on President Trump in a general election campaign — and whether he would be up to the rigors and stress of serving as president.

On Tuesday, the Biden campaign released a statement from Dr. Kevin O'Connor, who served as White House physician to Biden for several years.

"Vice President Biden is a healthy, vigorous 77-year-old male, who is fit to successfully execute the duties of the presidency, to include those as chief executive, head of state and commander in chief,” Dr. Kevin O’Connor said.

In his report, O’Connor said that Biden is currently being treated for non-valvular atrial-fibrillation, better known as Afib, which is an irregular heartbeat. He said Biden is also being treated for hyperlipidemia, which is an abnormally high concentration of fats or lipids in the blood, as well as gastroesophageal reflux, a digestive disorder that occurs when acidic stomach juices, or food and fluids, back up from the stomach into the esophagus. And he noted that Biden – as many Americans do – suffers from seasonal allergies.

BLOOMBERG RELEASES LETTER FROM DOCTOR SAYING HE'S IN 'OUTSTANDING HEALTH'

“For these, he takes three common prescription medications and two common over-the-counter medications,” O’Connor said.

His report listed Biden's weight as 178 pounds and his height as 5 feet, 11.65 inches.

Biden's campaign did not immediately respond to Fox News' request for comment.

Scheiner also commented on former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's health. Bloomberg, also 77, threw his hat into the 2020 race late and provoked speculation that he thought 2020 frontrunners like Biden couldn't cut it.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Bloomberg previously released his medical history with his doctor describing his health as "outstanding."

“'Outstanding health'? With that history, I wouldn’t call it outstanding health,” Scheiner said, referring to the description as "hyperbole."

Bloomberg's doctor had disclosed that the former mayor was receiving treatment for arthritis and heartburn. The letter added that Bloomberg takes a blood thinner to treat atrial fibrillation and another medication to control his cholesterol.

Fox News' Paul Steinhauser and Kelly Phares contributed to this report.

Original Article

Rep. Justin Amash, former Republican, backs impeachment: Trump has ‘abused and violated the public trust’

closeRep. Justin Amash, former Republican, speaks out in favor of impeachment: Trump has 'abused and violated the public trust'Video

Rep. Justin Amash, former Republican, speaks out in favor of impeachment: Trump has 'abused and violated the public trust'

Rep. Justin Amash, former Republican, speaks out in favor of impeachment: Trump has 'abused and violated the public trust'

Rep. Justin Amash, I-Mich., who left the Republican Party earlier this year citing "disenchant[ment] with party politics" spoke out in support of impeaching President Trump Wednesday.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., gave Amash the floor during a House session debating the impeachment articles, and the Michigan lawmaker went on to cite the Federalist Papers and Constitution to claim Trump committed the "high crimes and misdemeanors" outlined therein.

Amash said he is supporting impeachment not because of partisanship, but because in his view Trump has objectively abused his office.

"I come to the floor not as a Democrat, not as a Republican, but as an American who cares deeply about the Constitution, the rule of law, and the rights of the people," Amash said.

"Under our system of government, impeachment is not about policy disagreements or ineffective governance, nor is it about criminality based on statutes that did not exist at the time our Constitution was written."

FLASHBACK: MICHIGAN REP. JUSTIN AMASH ANNOUNCES HE IS LEAVING GOP — TRUMP CALLS IT 'GREAT NEWS'

President Trump rips Rep. Justin Amash after congressman says he's quitting the Republican PartyVideo

He said that instead, impeachment is about maintaining the "integrity of the office of the presidency" and ensuring presidential power is used properly and lawfully.

"The Constitution describes such conduct as high crimes and misdemeanors because it pertains to high office and it relates to the misuse of that office," Amash continued.

He quoted Alexander Hamilton's Federalist Paper 65, noting that Hamilton defined 'high crimes and misdemeanors' as offenses related to misconduct by public officials that violate the public trust.

"President Donald J. Trump has abused and violated the public trust by using his high office to solicit the aid of a foreign power," Amash claimed. "Not for the benefit of the United States of America, but instead for his personal and political gain."

The Michigan lawmaker closed by claiming Trump's actions in regard to Ukraine were exactly the offenses Hamilton had warned about.

"It is our duty to impeach him," he said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Amash, a libertarian and a critic of President Trump, announced in July via a The Washington Post op-ed that he was leaving the GOP.

In the column, he said he had once run as a Republican due to the GOP’s belief in limited government, economic freedom and individual liberty.

"In recent years, though, I’ve become disenchanted with party politics and frightened by what I see from it,” he said in the op-ed. “The two-party system has evolved into an existential threat to American principles and institutions.”

At the time, Trump responded with a parting shot at the lawmaker on Twitter:

"[O]ne of the dumbest & most disloyal men in Congress is 'quitting' the Party," the president quipped, later calling Amash a "loser."

Just before yielding the floor to Amash, Schiff responded to Republicans who criticized the impeachment process as a "Star Chamber."

"My Democratic colleagues claimed the Russians influenced the outcome of the 2016 election — but based on their corrupt impeachment proceedings it appears my colleagues have been influenced by how Russia conducts political trials," Rep. Gary Palmer, R-Ala., had remarked. "No real evidence, no crime, no due process, and no justice."

"The repetition of this falsehood does not make it true," Schiff responded.

Fox News' Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Original Article

Ronny Jackson, former White House doctor and VA nominee, running for Congress in Texas

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 10Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 10

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 10 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

A former chief White House physician and one-time troubled nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is running for a congressional seat in Texas.

Retired Navy Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson filed candidate paperwork in Austin to replace outgoing Rep. Mac Thornberry hours before the Monday deadline, The Texas Tribune reported. He will face 13 other candidates for the Republican nomination.

Thornberry's 13th Congressional District in the Texas Panhandle overwhelmingly voted for President Trump in 2016. The Republican Party of Texas did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Fox News.

FLASHBACK TO 2018: TRUMP IS IN EXCELLENT PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH, WH DOCTOR SAYS

In this April 2, 2018, file photo, then-White House physician and nominee for Veterans Affairs Secretary Dr. Ronny Jackson arrives at the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. Jackson is running as a Republican in 2020 for a rural congressional seat in Texas. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

In this April 2, 2018, file photo, then-White House physician and nominee for Veterans Affairs Secretary Dr. Ronny Jackson arrives at the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. Jackson is running as a Republican in 2020 for a rural congressional seat in Texas. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Jackson, a Texas native, had worked as a White House physician since 2006 and was Trump's surprise choice last year to head the VA. He retired from the Navy last week.

His nomination ran into trouble when allegations of drinking on the job, creating a hostile work environment and overprescribing medications surfaced. He denied any wrongdoing and eventually withdrew his name from consideration.

Trump re-nominated Jackson earlier this year for a second star amid a Pentagon investigation into his conduct.

Dr. Ronny Jackson withdraws nomination for VA SecretaryVideo

Trump called him "one of the finest men I've ever met," noting that he received good evaluations from his predecessor, former President Barack Obama. The promotion was not approved by the Senate.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In January 2018, Jackson gave Trump a glowing report on his physical and mental well-being in his first medical checkup since taking office, saying Trump was "in excellent health" at the time.

Original Article

Former top attorney for Obama suggests Dems should impeach Trump again if Senate acquits

closeHogan Gidley says President Trump welcomes an impeachment trial in the SenateVideo

Hogan Gidley says President Trump welcomes an impeachment trial in the Senate

White House deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley joins Melissa Francis on 'Outnumbered Overtime.'

An impeachment trial in the Republican-led Senate is largely expected to fail but that may not stop some Democrats from pushing for another impeachment after President Trump's would-be reelection in 2020.

"If the Senate doesn’t vote to convict Trump, or tries to monkey w his trial, he could of course be retried in the new Senate should he win re-election," tweeted Neal Katyal, who served as acting solicitor general under former President Obama.

"Double jeopardy protections do not apply," he added, referring to the principle that suspects can't be tried twice for the same crime. "And Senators voting on impeachment in the next months know this."

Katyal went on to promote his book pushing impeachment on Twitter. He was one of the lawyers who fought President Trump's travel ban in court.

DOES PELOSI HAVE THE VOTES FOR IMPEACHMENT?

Katyal's tweet served as another indication that Democrats would continue investigating President Trump's conduct regardless of the outcome of the current impeachment inquiry.

More from Media

Republicans have argued that Democrats always intended to impeach Trump and overturn the results of the 2016 election. Prior to the current inquiry, some Democrats called for Trump's impeachment after the Justice Department released former Special Counsel Robert Mueller's findings on the Russia investigation.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., held back on impeachment proceedings until details surfaced surrounding President Trump's July call with Ukraine.

On Thursday, the speaker urged Democrats to proceed with articles of impeachment, which could include charges related to the Russia investigation and other complaints House Democrats have lodged against the president.

Original Article

Sen. Kennedy claims former Ukraine leader ‘actively’ worked with Hillary Clinton in 2016

closeSen. Kennedy reacts to McGahn subpoena, clarifies Ukraine election meddling commentsVideo

Sen. Kennedy reacts to McGahn subpoena, clarifies Ukraine election meddling comments

Republican Sen. John Kennedy reacts on 'America's Newsroom' to White House counsel Don McGahn being subpoenaed to testify on Capitol Hill and clarifies his comments on the DNC server hacking in 2016.

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., on Sunday walked back an erroneous comment he made last weekend touting the debunked theory that Ukraine hacked the Democratic National Committee's emails in 2016, but then quickly followed that up with another unproven theory accusing former Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko of actively working for Hillary Clinton in her 2016 presidential run.

Speaking on NBC’s “Meet The Press,” Kennedy admitted he was wrong when he told Chris Wallace on “Fox News Sunday” last week that Ukraine could have been responsible for meddling in the 2016 presidential elections.

MARK LEVIN BLASTS MEDIA'S UKRAINE NARRATIVE, CLAIMS TRANSCRIPT DESTROYS BIDEN 'FAVOR' ARGUMENT

“I walked it back because I was wrong,” Kennedy said, adding that he thought Wallace asked if Ukraine had meddled in the U.S. elections, not about discredited theories of Ukrainian hacking. “I went back and looked at the transcript and realized Chris was right and I was wrong.”

New report raises questions about timing of President Trump's decision to release US aid to UkraineVideo

Kennedy, however, went on to make another unfounded accusation when he accused Poroshenko of “actively” working with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during her White House bid in 2016.

“Russia was very aggressive and they're much more sophisticated,” he said. “But the fact that Russia was so aggressive does not exclude the fact that President Poroshenko actively worked for Secretary Clinton.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

A flabbergasted NBC anchor Chuck Todd countered that the only other person pushing this narrative of Ukrainians working to get Clinton elected is Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Witnesses shoot down claims of Ukraine meddling in 2016 electionVideo

“You've done exactly what the Russian operation is trying to get American politicians to do,” Todd said. “Are you at all concerned that you've been duped?”

Kennedy countered naming a number of news publications who have reported on the theory, including the Financial Times, the Washington Examiner and Politico. A 2017 Politico article has been widely referenced in supporting claims of a pro-Clinton bias from Poroshenko and the government in Kiev at the time.

“You should read the articles,” Kennedy said. “They're very well documented.”

Politico’s reporting since the 2017 article has stated that “no evidence has emerged” to support the claims that Ukrainian officials were working with the Clinton camp. In a statement to the Washington Examiner, the news website added that the previous reporting indicated that Ukraine worked with intermediaries at the DNC to spread dirt on then-candidate Donald Trump.

Original Article

Federal appeals court to hear arguments in former WH counsel McGahn’s subpoena case

closeAppeals court stays McGahn subpoena as judiciary impeachment hearings set to beginVideo

Appeals court stays McGahn subpoena as judiciary impeachment hearings set to begin

Rep. Andy Biggs reacts to the impeachment proceedings.

A federal appeals court in Washington D.C. granted the Justice Department’s request to temporarily stay a lower court ruling compelling former White House Counsel Don McGahn to comply with a House Judiciary Committee subpoena.

The appeals court’s decision means that arguments will be heard at the beginning of January to decide whether the court should grant a longer stay and whether the White House can assert “absolute immunity” to shield top aides from testifying before Congress.

The House Judiciary Committee wants to hear from McGahn over allegations President Trump tried to obstruct the Russia election interference investigation.

TRUMP DEFENDS MOVE TO BLOCK IMPEACHMENT TESTIMONY, SAYS HE IS PROTECTING 'FUTURE PRESIDENTS'

The move by the appeals court comes a day federal district court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson issued a seven-day stay while McGahn’s lawyers sought their appeal. While the House Judiciary Committee opposed any stay on the order for McGahn to appear on Capitol Hill, the committee said it would not oppose an administrative stay.

Ex-White House counsel Don McGahn ordered to appear before CongressVideo

Jackson ruled on Monday that McGahn must appear before Congress pursuant to a subpoena issued earlier this year, saying that if McGahn wanted to assert executive privilege to avoid testifying, he needs to appear before Congress and do it himself.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed McGahn on April 22, but the White House quickly blocked his appearance. Monday's ruling had apparent ramifications for Democrats seeking to compel other top White House officials to testify as part of their ongoing impeachment inquiry concerning President Trump’s Ukraine policy.

Sen. Kennedy reacts to McGahn subpoena, clarifies Ukraine election meddling commentsVideo

The panel has been probing possible obstruction of justice by the president in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe.

Fox News' William Mears contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former California lawmaker to pay $150G after using campaign cash for Asia trip, Hawaii home fix-up: reports

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 23Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 23

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 23 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

A former California Democratic lawmaker was ordered to pay $150,000 on Thursday after admitting to pulling funds from campaign coffers in part to pay for a trip to Asia, finance an expensive remodeling project on his Hawaii vacation home, and book flights for him and his wife to London and Washington, D.C.

Joseph Canciamilla, 64, was slapped with the maximum penalty the state allows for a campaign finance violation following a unanimous vote by the state's Fair Political Practices Commission.

CALIFORNIA AG'S ANTI-TRUMP LAWSUITS ARE POLITICAL, HAVE COST TAXPAYERS $21M, STATE GOP SAYS

An investigation conducted by the California elections watchdog found Canciamilla misused more than $130,000 in campaign dollars raised from two local fundraising committees he created and falsified state filings to cover up the spending, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

“This is a spectacular fall from grace,” Commissioner Frank Cardenas told The Sacramento Bee. “It’s a breathtaking arrogance. There are particularly egregious issues here that appear to go, at least on their face, beyond mirror of civil law.”

“It’s a breathtaking arrogance. There are particularly egregious issues here that appear to go, at least on their face, beyond mirror of civil law.”

— Frank Cardenas, Fair Political Practices Commission

Commissioner Alison Hayward told San Francisco’s KPIX-TV Canciamilla’s violations were “particularly repugnant.”

“They show that a person who is raising money in trust for a political purpose is then converting that money to personal income,” she added.

(Joseph Canciamilla, a former Democrat who's no longer affiliated with a party, served in the California State Assembly in Sacramento from 2000 to 2006, then was appointed clerk-recorder in Contra Costa County​​​​​​. (Contra Costa County website))

Canciamilla served in the California State Assembly in Sacramento from 2000 to 2006 before he was appointed clerk-recorder in Contra Costa County near San Francisco. He served as a Democrat at the time. He is now registered as “No Party Preference,” according to The Bee.

The violations were found in the use of funding from one committee formed in 2011 for his campaign for judge in Contra Costa County Superior Court. He ultimately did not enter that race. Canciamilla also misused money raised in a second committee formed in 2012 for clerk-recorder. He won that office twice before abruptly resigning Oct. 31 when the campaign violations were discovered.

“Mr. Canciamilla has taken full responsibility for this situation, is humbled and embarrassed, and hopes the FPPC fines won’t severely overshadow his 46 years of public service to the residents of Contra Costa County,” a statement from his attorney, Andy Rockas, said in a statement, according to The Chronicle.

He “has cooperated with the FPPC, has paid back all disputed amounts, and all fines listed in the proposed stipulation have been paid in full,” it added.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

The commission launched an investigation after the Political Reform Audit Program of the Franchise Tax Board found irregularities in his filings. Canciamilla’s spending “was concealed on campaign statements by other reporting violations including non-reporting and the over-statement of available cash on hand,” according to the elections watchdog.

Canciamilla agreed to pay the $150,000 settlement for violating the Political Reform Act, which prohibits candidates from mixing campaign funds with personal finances. The commission also referred the case to the Contra Costa County’s district attorney’s office, which will decide whether to file criminal charges. The county’s retirement will also review his pension.

Original Article

Former Trump national security adviser John Bolton agrees to book deal, report says

closeBolton, Mulvaney defy subpoenas, fail to appear in impeachment inquiryVideo

Bolton, Mulvaney defy subpoenas, fail to appear in impeachment inquiry

Former National Security Adviser John Bolton and OMB Director Mick Mulvaney are no-shows on Capitol Hill as the DOJ and White House lawyers argue top aides have absolute immunity from congressional subpoenas. Constitutional attorney David Rivkin reacts.

John Bolton, President Trump's former national security adviser, is the latest former White House official to receive a book deal, The Associated Press reported Saturday.

Bolton's deal with Simon & Schuster is worth about $2 million, two publishing officials familiar with the negotiations told AP. The officials didn't know when the book would be released or its title, and spoke anonymously to the AP because they were not authorized to publicly discuss it.

Bolton was represented by the Javelin literary agency, whose clients include former FBI Director James Comey and the anonymous Trump administration official whose book, "A Warning," comes out Nov. 19. Neither Javelin nor Simon & Schuster responded to Fox News requests for comment.

BOLTON LAWYER TEASES KNOWLEDGE ABOUT UKRAINE NOT YET MADE PUBLIC IN LETTER TO CONGRESS

Lawyer for John Bolton says his client knows about 'many relevant meetings' on UkraineVideo

The conservative Threshold Editions, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, published Bolton's 2007 book "Surrender is Not an Option: Defending America at the United Nations and Abroad."

Bolton, a foreign policy hawk, left the White House in September over clashes with President Trump, who said he fired Bolton because he "disagreed strongly" with his suggestions. Bolton quickly challenged Trump's assertion, saying he had offered to resign.

The two disagreed on a number of national security issues, including the plans for a drawdown of U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

BOLTON WARNED OF 'HAND GRENADE' GIULIANI, SHUT DOWN UKRAINE MEETING, AIDE TOLD IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

Bolton has returned to the spotlight during the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry into President Trump's request of his Ukrainian counterpart to "look into” former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter's dealings in the Eastern European country. The probe stems from a whistleblower complaint about a July 25 phone call between Trump and Zelensky during which Democrats claim Trump offered a "quid pro quo" in exchange for withheld U.S. military aid.

Bolton deputy skips closed-door interview in impeachment inquiryVideo

Bolton's lawyer, Charles Cooper, said in a letter to the top lawyer for the House of Representatives Friday that his client was involved in "many relevant meetings and conversations" to the Democrats' impeachment inquiry, but suggested that Bolton will only appear before Congress if a judge orders it.

A former top White House expert on Russia, Fiona Hill, testified that Bolton had warned that Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was a "hand grenade" who was "going to blow up everyone," and distanced himself from the efforts to leverage Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, according to transcripts released Friday.

Hill also described how Bolton had "immediately stiffened" as Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland "blurted out" that he had worked out a trade — the Ukrainians' probe for an Oval Office welcome for Kiev's new president — with Trump's acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney. According to Hill, Bolton later told her that "I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up" and asked her to relay that message to a White House lawyer.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Appointed in April 2018, Bolton was Trump's third national security adviser. In a speech in late September to the Center for Strategic and International Studies, given after he left the administration, Bolton offered a far more aggressive approach to North Korea's nuclear program than the one advocated by Trump, who has spoken warmly about North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

"Every day that goes by makes North Korea a more dangerous country," Bolton said. "You don't like their behavior today, what do you think it will be when they have nuclear weapons that can be delivered to American cities?"

Fox News' Adam Shaw, Brooke Singman and Vandana Rambaran contributed to this report, as well as The Associated Press.

Original Article

House withdraws subpoena for former National Security Council deputy Charles Kupperman

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 6Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 6

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 6 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

House Democrats on Wednesday withdrew a subpoena for former White House Deputy National Security Adviser Charles Kupperman, less than two weeks after Kupperman asked a federal court whether he should comply with the order.

Kupperman, who left the administration when National Security Adviser John Bolton exited in September, was slated to appear before the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight Committees last month as part of their impeachment investigation and the Trump-Ukraine controversy.

Filing last month with U.S. District Court in Washington, Kupperman said he “cannot satisfy the competing demands of both the legislative and executive branches.” He said without the court’s help, he would have to make the decision himself, acknowledging that it could “inflict grave constitutional injury” on either Congress or the presidency.

TRANSCRIPT OF BILL TAYLOR'S TESTIMONY TO IMPEACHMENT PANEL RELEASED

A judge had scheduled a hearing for the matter in December, but that will now likely be canceled.

“The subpoena at issue in this matter has been withdrawn and there is no current intention to reissue it,” the court filing stated. “Therefore, this matter is moot and should be dismissed.”

Kupperman served as a deputy to Bolton, and the National Security Council’s current Russia and Europe director, Tim Morrison.

Public hearings set to begin on Trump impeachment inquiryVideo

The subpoena withdrawal comes as the House announced plans to hold public hearings next week as part of the impeachment probe. Three State Department officials will testify in hearings Nov. 13 and Nov. 15, according to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff. Schiff is leading the probe.

Schiff tweeted that top Ukraine diplomat William Taylor, career department official George Kent and former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch will testify. Yovanovitch was ousted in May at Trump's direction.

All three have previously testified behind closed doors.

The Democrats are investigating Trump's dealings with Ukraine and his requests for politically motivated investigations while the U.S. was holding on to several hundred million dollars in military aid for the Ukrainians.

Democrats on Wednesday also released hundreds of pages of testimony from Taylor’s time on Capitol Hill.

Taylor told impeachment investigators he understood that the security assistance, and not just a White House meeting for Ukraine's new president, was conditioned on the country committing to investigations of Trump rival Joe Biden and Democrats' actions in the 2016 election.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"That was my clear understanding, security assistance money would not come until the president committed to pursue the investigation," Taylor said.

He was asked if he was aware that "quid pro quo" meant "this for that."

House investigators release transcript of Amb. Bill Taylor's impeachment testimonyVideo

"I am," he replied.

The testimony from Taylor further connects the Trump administration to a quid-pro-quo arrangement involving Ukraine that is now at the heart of the House impeachment inquiry.

Fox News’ William Mears, Brooke Singman and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former NAACP president running to take back Cummings’ seat

closeDeath of Rep. Elijah Cummings draws bipartisan tributesVideo

Death of Rep. Elijah Cummings draws bipartisan tributes

Reaction pours in from Capitol Hill and beyond after the death of Maryland Democrat Rep. Elijah Cummings; Griff Jenkins reports from Baltimore.

The special election to replace late Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., is heating up as former NAACP President Kweisi Mfume announced plans Monday to seek his old seat again.

Mfume, a Democrat who represented the Baltimore-area congressional seat before Cummings from 1987 to 1996, is the second candidate to enter the Democratic primary. Talmadge Branch, the House of Delegates Majority Whip, said he would run on Thursday, according to the Baltimore Sun. Cummings' widow, Maya Rockeymoore-Cummings, has also said she is also considering joining the race.

"I honestly believe that I've got to find a way to make sure that all [Cummings] and others fought for is not lost, tossed to the side and forgotten," Mfume said to supporters at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore during the official kick-off of his campaign Monday, citing his previous experience in the seat and time as NAACP president as qualifications. "If I were not trusted, prepared and ready to go to work on day one I would not be here."

Former U.S. Rep. Kweisi Mfume (D-MD) speaks during funeral services for late U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings at the New Psalmist Baptist Church in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., October 25, 2019. Mfume announced Monday he would seek Cummings' seat in a special election.

Former U.S. Rep. Kweisi Mfume (D-MD) speaks during funeral services for late U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings at the New Psalmist Baptist Church in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., October 25, 2019. Mfume announced Monday he would seek Cummings' seat in a special election. (Reuters)

ELIJAH CUMMINGS REMEMBERED BY POLITICIANS, ACTIVISTS, CELEBRITIES

Mfume, who unsuccessfully sought a U.S. Senate seat in Maryland in 2006, talked about his upbringing during the civil rights era and his familiarity with segregation.

"I never had the experience of knowing what a white classmate was like until college," he said, explaining how those experiences shaped his views of "fair play."

"Far too many Americans, because of their race, their ethnicity, or their surname, find themselves standing before the gate of the American mainstream, recognizing that gate has not fully opened to them," he continued. "They are black, they are white, they are Latino, they are poor, they are affluent, and many others are trying to find a way to gain citizenship, to gain hope and to give back to this country."

In addition to his experience in the NAACP and in Congress — where he held several committee positions in addition to serving as the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus — Mfume served on the post-9/11 Continuity of Government Commission and a host of other boards and advisory councils.

CUMMINGS HONORED AT CAPITOL CEREMONY

Mfume is not the only highly-qualified Democrat in the mix for the 7th Congressional District seat. Branch has been a member of the Maryland House of Delegates since 1995 and has been a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. He was also a special assistant to former 7th District Rep. Parren J. Mitchell, D-Md., from 1984 to 1987.

"As House majority whip, I have the ability to bring people together," Branch told The Sun. "That makes me feel I am very qualified to do this. I know how to deliver and make sure funds go back to the community."

Rockeymoore-Cummings, chairwoman of the Maryland Democratic Party, is the founder, president and CEO of Global Policy Solutions, a consulting firm that advocates for clients including AARP and National Council of La Raza. She's also previously worked with the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and was the Chief of Staff to former Rep. Charlie Rangel, D-N.Y.

There are several other Democrats who are rumored to be thinking about entering what may be a crowded primary.

ELIJAH CUMMINGS HONORED AT DIGNITARY-PACKED FUNERAL, AS EULOGIES TAKE POLITICAL TURN

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan announced last month that candidates would have until Nov. 20 to file with the State Board of Elections for a Feb. 4 primary. The winner of the Democratic primary is favored to win the April 28 special election — which coincides with Maryland's 2020 primary date — as the 7th District is deeply Democratic.

"It is imperative for the 7th Congressional District to have a strong voice in the House of Representatives, and today we are ensuring the process to fill this historic Maryland seat moves forward in a fair and timely manner," he said.

Cummings, a civil rights icon who enjoyed deep respect from his colleagues on both sides of the aisle, died on Oct. 17. Tributes to Cummings poured in from lawmakers and others in politics in both major parties.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I was shocked and saddened to learn the news this morning of my dear friend’s passing," House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, a fellow Maryland Democrat, said in a statement. "Elijah Cummings was a man of principle, patriotism, and conviction, whose loss will be deeply felt throughout the State of Maryland and our country."

At the White House, the flag was lowered to half-staff.

"My warmest condolences to the family and many friends of Congressman Elijah Cummings," Trump tweeted. "I got to see first hand the strength, passion and wisdom of this highly respected political leader. His work and voice on so many fronts will be very hard, if not impossible, to replace!"

Fox News' Alex Pappas and Edmund DeMarche contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke drops out of 2020 presidential race

closeBeto O'Rourke drops out of presidential raceVideo

Beto O'Rourke drops out of presidential race

Former Texas Congressman Beto O'Rourke tweets that his campaign was about 'seeing clearly, speaking honestly and acting decisively'; reaction and analysis on 'The Five.'

Former Texas Democrat congressman Beto O'Rourke announced Friday he is withdrawing from the 2020 presidential race, telling supporters “it is clear to me now that this campaign does not have the means to move forward successfully.”

O'Rourke entered the race in March to great fanfare after nearly defeating Texas incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz in the 2018 midterms but struggled to gain traction in the massive Democratic primary field.

WARREN DEFENDS ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’ MATH, AS FUNDING PLAN FACES BIPARTISAN FIRE

“My service to the country will not be as a candidate or as the nominee,” O’Rourke wrote in a post on Medium. “Acknowledging this now is in the best interests of those in the campaign; it is in the best interests of this party as we seek to unify around a nominee; and it is in the best interests of the country.”

An O'Rourke spokesperson confirmed to Fox News that the candidate had ruled out running for the Senate next year, when Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, is up for re-election.

President Trump reacted to the news by tweeting Friday, "Oh no, Beto just dropped out of race for President despite him saying he was 'born for this.' I don’t think so!"

O'Rourke sought to make gun control a top issue in his campaign, most notably after the Aug. 3 mass shooting in his hometown of El Paso. He went so far as to embrace the confiscation of certain firearms, memorably saying in a September debate, "Hell yes, we are going to take your AR-15."

The 47-year-old O'Rourke was urged to run for president by many Democrats who were energized by last year's narrow Senate in reliably Republican Texas. He raised an astonishing amount of money from small donors across the country, visited every county in the Lone Star State and used social media and livestreaming video to engage directly with voters. He ultimately lost to Cruz by three percentage points.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

But O'Rourke struggled to replicate that model in the presidential primary and both his polling and his fundraising had dwindled significantly in recent months.

"I am grateful to all the people who made up the heart and soul of this campaign," O'Rourke said on Twitter Friday. "You were among the hundreds of thousands who made a donation, signed up to volunteer or spread the word about this campaign and our opportunity to help decide the election of our lifetime. Our campaign has always been about seeing clearly, speaking honestly, and acting decisively."

Fox News' Patrick Ward and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former President Jimmy Carter released from hospital after fall at Georgia home

closeJimmy Carter says he hopes 'there's an age limit' for presidency in apparent jab at Joe Biden, Bernie SandersVideo

Jimmy Carter says he hopes 'there's an age limit' for presidency in apparent jab at Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders

Former President Jimmy Carter says he hopes 'there's an age limit' for presidency. The jab could be aimed at President Trump, Senator Bernie Sanders and Former Vice President Joe Biden’s age. The three are all well into their 70s.

Former President Jimmy Carter was released from a Georgia hospital Thursday after receiving treatment for a minor pelvic fracture.

Carter, 95, suffered a fall in his home in Plains, Ga., Monday and was taken to Phoebe Sumter Medical Center for observation and medical care.

FORMER PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER HOSPITALIZED AFTER ANOTHER FALL AT HIS GEORGIA HOME

"Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter has been released from Phoebe Sumter Medical Center. He is looking forward to continuing to recuperate at his home in Plains, Georgia, and thanks everyone for their kind well wishes," Deanna Congileo, director of communications for The Carter Center, said in a statement.

Carter also fell at his home earlier this month, resulting in a black eye and leading him to receive 14 stitches above his brow. The injury did not keep the 39th president from helping the nonprofit organization, Habitat for Humanity, to build a home in Tennessee.

“I had a No. 1 priority and that was to come to Nashville and build houses,” Carter told a crowd earlier this month while addressing his brief hospital visit. Carter, the following day, participated in his 36th building project with Habitat for Humanity.

Carter also fell in his home in May, after which he had successful hip replacement surgery.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In August 2015, Carter announced that doctors had found melanoma in his brain and liver. He underwent radiation treatment and announced in December of that year that he was cancer-free.

This year, Carter became the oldest living U.S. president, following the death of former President George H.W. Bush in November 2018.

Fox News' Brooke Singman, David Lewkowict, Stephen Sorace and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former President Jimmy Carter hospitalized after another fall at his Georgia home

closeJimmy Carter says he hopes 'there's an age limit' for presidency in apparent jab at Joe Biden, Bernie SandersVideo

Jimmy Carter says he hopes 'there's an age limit' for presidency in apparent jab at Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders

Former President Jimmy Carter says he hopes 'there's an age limit' for presidency. The jab could be aimed at President Trump, Senator Bernie Sanders and Former Vice President Joe Biden’s age. The three are all well into their 70s.

Former President Jimmy Carter was hospitalized after again falling at his home in Georgia, a spokesperson said Tuesday.

“Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter had a fall yesterday evening at his home in Plains, Georgia,” Deanna Congileo, director of communications for The Carter Center, said in a statement. “He is in good spirits and is looking forward to recovering at home.”

JIMMY CARTER BUILDS HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HOME, DESPITE BLACK EYE, STITCHES FROM FALL

The statement said he's been admitted to Phoebe Sumter Medical Center "for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture."

Carter, 95, also fell at his home in Plains earlier this month. He received 14 stitches above his brow and sustained a black eye. The injury did not keep the 39th president from helping the nonprofit organization, Habitat for Humanity, to build a home in Tennessee.

“I had a No. 1 priority and that was to come to Nashville and build houses,” Carter told a crowd earlier this month while addressing his brief hospital visit. Carter, the following day, participated in his 36th building project with Habitat for Humanity.

Carter, whose birthday was Oct. 1, appeared at the building site with his left eye swollen and bruised. He wore a white bandage above his eye. His wife, former first lady Rosalynn Carter, 92, joined him.

Former President Jimmy Carter answers questions during a news conference at a Habitat for Humanity project Monday, Oct. 7, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Carter fell at home on Sunday, requiring over a dozen stitches, but he did not let his injuries keep him from participating in his 36th building project with the nonprofit Christian housing organization. He turned 95 last Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Former President Jimmy Carter answers questions during a news conference at a Habitat for Humanity project Monday, Oct. 7, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Carter fell at home on Sunday, requiring over a dozen stitches, but he did not let his injuries keep him from participating in his 36th building project with the nonprofit Christian housing organization. He turned 95 last Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Before construction began, Carter led a morning devotion for a group of several hundred volunteers.

Carter said God gives all life and freedom. "With our freedom, every one of us can make a basic decision. … 'What kind of person do I, myself, choose to be?'"

He said every person "can be a complete success in the eyes of God."

FORMER PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER RELEASED FROM HOSPITAL FOLLOWING HIP SURGERY

Carter also suffered a fall at his home earlier this year, which resulted in a broken hip. The 39th president was given successful hip replacement surgery in Mayat Phoebe Sumter Medical Center in Americus, Ga. Carter fell while leaving to go turkey hunting.

This year, Carter became the oldest living U.S. president, following the death of former President George H.W. Bush in November 2018.

Carter served as president from 1977 to 1981 and has lived the longest after leaving office—with January 20 of this year marking 38 years since he was succeeded by Ronald Reagan.

In August 2015, Carter announced that doctors had found melanoma in his brain and liver. He underwent radiation treatment and later announced, in December 2015, that he was cancer-free.

Fox News' David Lewkowict, Stephen Sorace and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Former Kentucky GOP candidate for governor endorses Democrat against Republican incumbent

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 21Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 21

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 21 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

A former Republican candidate for Kentucky governor has endorsed incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin's Democratic rival.

William Woods announced his endorsement of Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear in a video posted Monday to Twitter.

"This election isn't about politics to me, It's about doing the right thing," Woods said. “I’m ready for a governor who will respect all of us, regardless of political affiliation."

Woods finished a distant third in May's gubernatorial primary with just over 14,000 votes, compared to 136,000 votes for Bevin.

In his message, Woods cited Beshear's support for public schools and law enforcement. The reference to schools refers to last year's tensions between teachers and state Republican lawmakers over several education bills.

At one point, teachers across the state called in sick in protest against changes to the management of their pension system, forcing some school districts to close several times.

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, left, and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear participate in a debate at the Singletary Center for the Arts on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., on Oct. 15. (Ryan C. Hermens/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP, Pool)

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, left, and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear participate in a debate at the Singletary Center for the Arts on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., on Oct. 15. (Ryan C. Hermens/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP, Pool)

Bevin criticized the "sickouts" and state educators, saying they left "students in the lurch."

In a statement to Fox News, Bevin's campaign manager, Davis Paine, said the governor is "proud to have the support of real Kentucky leaders on both sides of the aisle, Republicans and Democrats."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"It’s not news that Andy Beshear has earned the support of an unknown anti-Trump liberal," Paine added.

President Trump has thrown his support to Bevin and plans to hold a rally on Nov. 4 — the day before the election — at Rupp Arena in Lexington.

Original Article

Former VA secretary claims Trump weighed closing parts of health system

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 16Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 16

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 16 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin has claimed that President Trump considered issuing an executive order to close parts of the VA health system without consulting Congress.

According to The Associated Press, which obtained an advance copy of Shulkin's forthcoming book "It Shouldn't Be This Hard to Serve Your Country," Trump raised the matter with Shulkin during a March 2017 conversation in the Oval Office.

INGRAHAM: 'SWAMPINESS OF THE BIDEN'S' REMINDS AMERICANS WHY THEY VOTED FOR TRUMP

David Shulkin, right, was dismissed as VA Secretary in March 2018. (FILE)

David Shulkin, right, was dismissed as VA Secretary in March 2018. (FILE)

Trump was fresh off his 2016 campaign in which privatizing VA had become a political hot button after he pledged to steer more veterans to private-sector doctors outside the VA. He had said the VA was the "the most corrupt" and "probably the most incompetently run" Cabinet department.

During the meeting, Shulkin says Trump asked whether “we should begin to close the VAs,” referring to government-run medical centers that he viewed as poorly performing. Federal law prohibited such measures, so Shulkin answered that the VA was working with Congress to set up a system-wide review to address underperforming facilities, whether by fixing or closing.

“But this takes time,” Shulkin said.

Trump exclaimed, “So let’s just do an executive order!”

“This is a legislative issue,” Shulkin said.

Shulkin writes blistering op-ed about leaving VA DepartmentVideo

Trump then offered, “Can’t we just declare a national emergency?”

At that point, the president's son-in-law and White House adviser, Jared Kushner, said: "Yes. We're still in a war, so we could."

Shulkin told the AP that ultimately he dissuaded Trump from pursuing that route, persuading him to sign executive orders for changes with wider support, such as expanded telehealth options for veterans.

"Much of my narrative deals with the factions pushing me to simply close the VA or at least large parts of it that weren't working well," Shulkin writes in the book, due out Oct. 22. "But I didn't see how shutting down a system specifically designed to care for veterans could be in the veterans' best interests."

Was David Shulkin fired or did he resign?Video

Legislation that Trump signed last year gives veterans more freedom to see doctors outside the VA in an effort to cut wait times, paving the way for new rules that Shulkin says will "lead to the rapid dismantling of the current VA system." Recent studies have actually found that veterans got into a VA facility for an appointment faster on average and received better care than if they went to a private facility, raising questions about the value of steering veterans to the private sector if it results in inferior care.

The legislation expanding the Choice program includes a provision for a presidentially appointed commission to be set up in 2021, after voters elected the next president, to compile a list of VA facilities nationwide to be closed or reconfigured. If the president approves, closures would then begin unless Congress voted down the entire list, giving lawmakers no input on individual facilities to be added or removed.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Shulkin was fired in March 2018 amid investigations into alleged spending abuses and reports of internal dissension at the VA. The agency's internal watchdog had found that Shulkin had improperly accepted Wimbledon tennis tickets and his then-chief of staff had doctored emails to justify his wife traveling to Europe with him at taxpayer expense. Shulkin agreed to reimburse the government more than $4,000 in that case.

He later ripped Trump publically because of the “toxic, chaotic, disrespectful and subversive” environment of Washington.

“As many of you know, I am a physician, not a politician,” Shulkin wrote in a New York Times op-ed published after his firing. “I came to government with an understanding that Washington can be ugly, but I assumed that I could avoid all of the ugliness by staying true to my values.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Bolton instructed former Russia adviser to alert NSC lawyer over Ukraine

closeFiona Hill praises ousted Amb. Marie Yovanovitch at impeachment inquiry hearingVideo

Fiona Hill praises ousted Amb. Marie Yovanovitch at impeachment inquiry hearing

Former White House senior adviser on Russia and Europe is the latest official to answer questions as part of House Democrats' impeachment probe; chief congressional correspondent Mike Emanuel reports from Capitol Hill.

Fiona Hill, the former senior director for Russian and Eurasian affairs, told lawmakers on Monday that a July meeting left government officials so concerned about the Trump administration's efforts to pressure Ukraine, that John Bolton, the former national security adviser, directed her to alert a lawyer in the National Security Council, Fox News confirmed.

Hill, who exited the administration days before the July 25 phone call between President Trump and Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelensky, testified on Monday for about nine hours in front of three House panels. She raised concerns about a July 10 meeting where top officials discussed Ukraine and the investigations into the Bidens.

Oct. 14: Former White House advisor on Russia, Fiona Hill, leaves Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Oct. 14: Former White House advisor on Russia, Fiona Hill, leaves Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Both Bolton and Hill, who were present at the meeting, had concerns about the conversation, she testified. Bolton directed her to talk to John Eisenberg, a lawyer at the NSC, she said. The Wall Street Journal first reported on her testimony in the impeachment inquiry.

The New York Times reported that during the meeting, Bolton got into a heated exchange with Gordon D. Sondland, the European Union ambassador. The paper reported that Sondland worked with Rudy Giuliani, Trump's personal lawyer, to pressure the Ukrainians to investigate the Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden. Hill reportedly said Bolton likened the former New York City mayor to a “hand grenade who’s going to blow everybody up.” She said it appeared Giuliani was not working in coordination with the normal foreign policy channels when dealing with Ukraine.

Bolton chides Trump through leakVideo

The Times, citing two people familiar with the testimony, reported that Hill said Bolton told her to tell Eisenberg that Giuliani was working with the White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, on the rogue investigation.

“I am not part of whatever drug deal Rudy and Mulvaney are cooking up,” Bolton reportedly told White House attorneys. The Washington Post reported that investigators are now considering calling Bolton to testify. Sondland is expected to testify later this week.

Fox News sent an after-hours email to spokespersons for Giuliani, Bolton, and Sondland and did not get an immediate response. Hill did not immediately respond to other media outlets including the Times and Journal.

President Trump has insisted that any request for Kiev to investigate Biden and his son, Hunter, was to make sure the country was working to weed out corruption. Trump expressed doubts about how Hunter Biden could land a $50,000-a-month job at a Ukrainian gas company with little to no experience in the sector or country.

Joe Biden said he played no role in his son’s business career. Democrats claim that Trump used the power of his office to try to damage a political opponent.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

“There was an official foreign policy, which was attempting to counter corruption in Ukraine. And then there was Rudy Giuliani, and, you know, the gang that couldn’t shoot straight who worked for him, who were…connected with corruption in Ukraine and promoting the corruption in Ukraine,” said Rep. Jamie Raskin, D., Md., told the Wall Street Journal after Hill’s testimony.

Original Article

Former DIA employee accused of leaking top secret information to reporters released on bond

closeDIA worker accused of leaking classified docs to reporters to remain in custodyVideo

DIA worker accused of leaking classified docs to reporters to remain in custody

Henry Kyle Frese is accused of sharing private information with two reporters, one of whom he was romantically involved with; Leland Vittert reports.

Henry Frese, the counterterrorism analyst for the Defense Intelligence Agency accused of leaking classified government information to two journalists, including one with whom he was romantically involved, was released Friday on bond.

Frese, who pleaded not guilty two days ago, was arraigned in a Virginia federal court. He made no statements in court and no new evidence was presented against him during the bond hearing.

A federal indictment against the 30-year-old, who is accused of using his position to pass on "top secret" information about foreign countries' weapons systems, was unsealed Wednesday.

"Frese was caught red-handed disclosing sensitive national security information for personal gain," Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers said in a press release. "Frese betrayed the trust placed in him by the American people– a betrayal that risked harming the national security of this country."

Frese's alleged motive was to advance the career of a female reporter he was having a relationship with, the FBI said in court documents. Frese allegedly also passed information to one of the woman's female colleagues at an "affiliated but different news outlet."

Authorities did not disclose the names of the two journalists but the Justice Department said they were from NBC and CNBC and cover national security.

Frese's case is one of six authorized disclosure cases that the Justice Department has cracked down on during the Trump administration.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

"We will continue in our efforts to punish and deter this behavior," Demers said.

In one of those cases, former Air Force linguist Reality Winner, who was an intelligence contractor for the National Security Agency, gave the news media classified information about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. She was arrested in 2017, pleaded guilty to federal charges and was sentenced to five years behind bars.

Fox News' Bill Mears contributed to this report.

Original Article