Buttigieg unveils immigration plan he says will reduce deportations, spur economic growth

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Democrats falling out of love with Pete Buttigieg

Reaction and analysis from radio show host Howie Carr.

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg on Sunday unveiled an immigration plan that he says will reprioritize the nation’s deportation efforts with the goal of cracking down on criminals and protecting otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants.

“Our immigration enforcement system is not working,” Buttigieg wrote. “Current enforcement practices not only terrorize communities but also make all of us less safe by pulling resources away from genuine public safety concerns. The net result is harmful to communities and corrodes what should be the mission and focus of enforcement officers.”

Buttigieg plans to implement an executive order to prioritize enforcement on undocumented immigrants who are a “genuine public safety threat.” A Buttigieg administration also would pursue deportations for those who have just entered the country and have no claim of asylum.

MAYOR PETE BECOMES MAIN TARGET FOR DEMS, MODERATES AND LEFTISTS ALIKE

The South Bend, Ind., mayor wrote that this “targeted and effective” approach will “assure law-abiding people who pose no public safety risk that they have nothing to fear from our government.”

Immigration enforcement has been a linchpin of Donald Trump's presidency, with his administraion ordering mass deportation roundups across the country earlier this year.

The same week he launched his 2020 reelection campaign in June, Trump announced a weekend of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids by tweeting that the agency “will begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States.”

Trump has deported 282,242 people in the fiscal year 2019, according to the Department of Homeland Security. Deportations, however, were higher under his predecessor, Barack Obama, who was labeled the “deporter-in-chief” by critics. According to DHS data, Obama removed more than 2 million illegal immigrants during his tenure.

Buttigieg also proposed updating the list of offenses that can prompt deportation, calling the current list “extensive, outdated, overly harsh, and inconsistent with criminal justice reforms.” Under his presidency, drug offenses and misdemeanors would not result in deportation. He plans to apply this rule retroactively to free the fear of deportation from those who have committed the low-level offenses.

Buttigieg vowed to end the 287 (g) agreement, which allowed local and state police departments to perform the functions of federal immigration officers. The move would “help establish trust between police and their communities,” he wrote.

He also plans to “reinstate and reinforce prohibitions against immigration enforcement near sensitive locations such as schools, health facilities, places of worship, and courts.”

Protecting the border

In order to protect the nation’s southern border and decrease the number of illegal crossings, Buttigieg said he would invest in “smart border technology” that is estimated to cost between $1 billion and $2 billion. He slammed Trump’s proposed border wall as “astronomically expensive and ineffective.”

Buttigieg also wants to make immigration court-independent, stripping control from the attorney general, which he said has led to “greater politicization, to the detriment of immigrants’ rights and lives.”

“This system will guarantee immigration judges full procedural power and ensure that all immigrants receive due process and timely resolution in their cases,” Buttigieg wrote.

“This system will guarantee immigration judges full procedural power and ensure that all immigrants receive due process and timely resolution in their cases.”

— Pete Buttigieg

A campaign spokesperson told Fox News that Buttigieg understands that “immigration is not exclusively a border issue,” adding that immigrants “power our nation's economy and contribute to the success of cities across our country, cities like South Bend.”

Buttigieg plans to unlock the economic potential of immigrants. He vowed to “modernize our employment-based visa system” by reviewing it every two years to change the number of visas allotted to immigrants if the economy requires more workers.

“This process will make our immigration system more adaptable, evidence-based, and competitive. It will be informed by labor market needs, engagement with immigrant and other stakeholders, and analysis of domestic and global trends,” Buttigieg wrote.

“This process will make our immigration system more adaptable, evidence-based, and competitive. It will be informed by labor market needs, engagement with immigrant and other stakeholders, and analysis of domestic and global trends.”

— Pete Buttigieg

Buttigieg said this will fix the backlogged system that prevents many from gaining access to the United States.

Temporary work visas won’t be tied to a single employer under a Buttigieg presidency, giving immigrants the freedom to move to a different employer within the same industry.

His Community Renewal Visa program would place immigrants in rural communities to supplement population loss and spur economic growth. If the immigrant remains in that community, they would be eligible for an expedited green card.

Buttigieg’s visa proposal would also prioritize health care workers in order to address the shortage in rural areas.

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He also plans to address the nation’s 11 million illegal immigrants.

“Undocumented people are our neighbors who raise families and pay taxes; share our workplaces and schools; pray in churches, synagogues, and mosques; and are Americans in every way except one — they are not citizens and have no pathway to citizenship,” he wrote.

Within the first 100 days of his presidency, Buttigieg promises he would push legislation to create that pathway to citizenship.

The immigration plan also calls for eliminating the Trump travel ban and raising the cap on refugees.

Original Article

Bernie Sanders, AOC hit the beach with LA rally, take swipes at Buttigieg over ‘wine cave’ fundraiser

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 21

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 21 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez took a swipe at South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg at a presidential campaign rally in Los Angeles on Saturday.

"We don't have a Super PAC, we don't want a Super PAC. We don't go to rich people's wine caves,” Sanders told the crowd in a reference to an elite California fundraiser Buttigieg held in a Napa Valley wine cave last weekend, KABC-TV of Los Angeles reported.

MAYOR PETE BECOMES MAIN TARGET FOR DEMS, MODERATES AND LEFTISTS ALIKE

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., greet the crowd during a rally in Venice, Calif., Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Kelvin Kuo)

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., greet the crowd during a rally in Venice, Calif., Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Kelvin Kuo)

“This is a campaign of the working class of this country, by the working class and for the working class," he said.

Thousands showed up to the beachside Venice rally just two days after the Democrats debated at nearby Loyola Marymount University.

"Our campaign is not only about defeating Trump, our campaign is about a political revolution,'' Sanders said, according to KABC. "It is about transforming this country, it is about creating a government and an economy that works for all people and not just the one percent.''

Ocasio-Cortez, who introduced the senator, endorsed him in October and has accompanied him at several of his rallies, including a large "Bernie's Back" gathering in New York City in October that came after Sanders recovered from a heart attack.

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Buttigieg is leading Sanders in a new Iowa poll, 24 percent to 21 percent, according to The Hill.

Original Article

Warren pops her cork on Buttigieg

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Pete Buttigieg's 'wine cave' fundraiser becomes Democrat debate's biggest moment

Mayor Pete Buttigieg is attacked by Sen. Elizabeth Warren for holding a fundraiser for wealthy donors in a 'wine cave.' Karl Rove and Donna Brazile react to the night's biggest headlines.

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On the roster: Warren pops her cork on Buttigieg – Pelosi, McConnell showdown looms in New Year – Quack in her heart again
WARREN POPS HER CORK ON BUTTIGIEG
NYT: “Does the road to the White House run through a wine cave? That was the question that electrified the Democratic debate in Los Angeles on Thursday. It was specific, referring to the location of a recent fund-raiser that Pete Buttigieg had held in Napa Valley. But it was also metaphoric, a stand-in for the wider argument among Democrats over pragmatism versus purity, compromise versus idealism, a candidate like Buttigieg or Joe Biden versus a candidate like Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders. As Warren blasted Buttigieg for kissing up to wealthy donors — and he portrayed her as an unpractical hypocrite — they weren’t really sparring over cabernet and cash. They were promoting separate strategies for winning the presidential election, different ways to position their party and vanquish Donald Trump. It was the same conflict that has defined the Democratic primary from the start, but with extra fury. Passions often burn hotter when alcohol is involved.”
Biden surefooted for a change – Politico:“But the most significant story of the most intense, substantive debate of the 2020 Democratic cycle is that Joe Biden – an almost default frontrunner who has managed to stumble at one point or another in each of the past debates—may have finally found his footing in an environment where he has demonstrated persistent discomfort. In a Democratic primary that has often sounded like a battle for the hearts of the progressive blogosphere, with candidates outdoing themselves to spin out the most inclusive, greenest, most redistributed vision of America, Biden has often felt like a throwback—a visitor from Obamaworld and other vanished lands who has trouble parrying attacks from sharper and fresher voices. In Thursday's debate, however, Biden consistently demonstrated the capacity not just to defend himself but to turn that defense into effective arguments for his candidacy.”
Nate Silver: Klobuchar shines – FiveThirtyEight: “I thought this was not only [Amy Klobuchar’s] best debate, but one of the better debates that any Democrat has had so far in the cycle. I say that because she was both pretty good on the substance and smart tactically — going after Buttigieg by emphasizing electability and experience is exactly the strategy I advocated for her at the start of the evening. I don’t know whether we’re going to get a Klobuchar surge — she’s at only at 3 percent nationally so she has a looooong way to go! — but if there’s one in the cards, tonight might have been the catalyst for it.”
Huckabee Sanders apologizes for mocking speech impediment – USA Today: “Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has apologized for a tweet appearing to mock former Vice President Joe Biden when he mentioned children with speech impediments who have asked him for advice because of his own experience with a lifelong stutter during the Democratic debate. ‘There’s not one line I go through that I don’t have at least a half a dozen people come up and hug me and say, ‘Can you help me?…’’ Biden said as he rounded out his debate appearance. ‘The little kid who says, ‘I-I-I-I can’t talk, what do I do?’…’ In a tweet that has since been deleted, Huckabee Sanders said, ‘I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I hhave absolutely no idea what Biden is talking about.’”
Dems nudge up qualifications for January debate – Des Moines Register: “The Democratic National Committee announced Friday that it will ratchet up poll performance and donations criteria for presidential candidates to qualify for the January debate in Iowa. The debate, scheduled for Jan. 14, will be hosted by CNN in partnership with the Des Moines Register and held on the Drake University campus in Des Moines. … To qualify for the January, candidates must have: Received 5% or more support in at least four different polls, which may be national polls or state polls in the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. That’s up from 4% for the December debate, held Thursday night. … [The second qualification:] donations from at least 225,000 total donors and at least 1,000 donors in at least 20 states. That’s up from 200,000 total donors and 800 donors in 20 states for the December debate.”
Bloomberg already boasts biggest early-state staff – McClatchy: “Michael Bloomberg’s presidential campaign has hired more than 200 staffers to work in 21 states, aides told McClatchy, providing the New York billionaire with the largest organization after the early voting states of any 2020 Democratic candidate. Bloomberg, a late entrant into the White House race, finalized a fleet of state leadership hires this week, signing on a cadre of former campaign hands to Barack Obama, past presidential and gubernatorial races and national and state party committees. It means Bloomberg, who is skipping the first four nominating contests in February, now has teams in nine of the 14 Super Tuesday states that vote on March 3, as well as aides in four states that vote in April. The campaign’s beefed up ground game supplement the north of $80 million the former New York City mayor has already spent on TV ads through this week.”
THE RULEBOOK: THE RACE IS ON
“When the States know that the Union can apply itself without their agency, it will be a powerful motive for exertion on their part.” – Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 36
TIME OUT: BIG FUN ON THE BAYOU
Garden&Gun: “Instead of leaving out cookies by the fireplace, Cajun Country welcomes Santa Claus with actual fire—a miles-long row of bonfires on the levees lining the Mississippi River. ‘As children, we were taught it was to light the way for Papa Noël to find his way into the swamplands,’ says John Folse, the heralded chef and author of The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine who grew up in St. James Parish, [Louisiana] the epicenter of the tradition started by early German and French settlers. … Beginning around noon Christmas Eve, families congregated and cooked, lit the fires, and feasted in the glow of roaring flames. Everyone in attendance brought a dish… But the center of the feast was always gumbo. ‘Every bonfire made a different kind,’ Folse says. … As the early Cajun and Creole settlers did before them, when Folse and his family finished their meal, they walked to church for midnight mass, stopping at fires along the way to warm up and chat with neighbors.”
[Ed. note: Well, it’s that time again… This will be the last full installment of the Halftime Report until after Christmas. We will be back a week from Monday in preparation for the beginning of what promises to be an exciting election year. Also, don’t forget to send in your nominations for the Best of Journalism 2019, the winners of which we will announce on Dec. 31. You can send your picks to HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM. More importantly, however, we hope you and your families are positively swimming in peace and joy this holiday season. For our Jewish friends who begin their celebration of Hanukkah on Sunday evening, we wish you Chag Sameach! For our fellow Christians who begin their celebration of on Tuesday evening we wish you the peace that transcends all understanding. And for everyone else, please enjoy the cookies and egg nog.]
Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.
SCOREBOARD
DEMOCRATIC 2020 POWER RANKING
Biden: 26.2 points (↓ 1.4 points from last wk.)
Sanders: 18.6 points (↑ 0.4 points from last wk.)
Warren: 16.2 points (↓ 2.2 points from last wk.)
Buttigieg: 9.4 points (↑ 0.8 points from last wk.)
Bloomberg: 5.2 points (first listing)
[Averages include: NBC News/WSJ, CNN, Quinnipiac University, USA Today/Suffolk University and NPR/PBS/Marist.]
TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE
Average approval: 43.8 percent
Average disapproval: 51.4 percent
Net Score: -7.6 percent
Change from one week ago: ↑ 1.8 points
[Average includes: NBC/WSJ: 44% approve – 54% disapprove; CNBC: 40% approve – 49% disapprove; CNN: 44% approve – 52% disapprove; Quinnipiac University: 43% approve – 52% disapprove; USA Today/Suffolk University: 48% approve – 50% disapprove.]
WANT MORE HALFTIME REPORT?
You can join Chris and Brianna every day on Fox Nation. Go behind-the-scenes of your favorite political note as they go through the must-read headlines of the day right from their office – with plenty of personality. Click here to sign up and watch!
PELOSI, MCCONNELL SHOWDOWN LOOMS IN NEW YEAR
Bloomberg: “House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell deepened their impasse over the terms of President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial Thursday, as Congress left Washington for the holidays without settling when and how it would take place. Pelosi surprised many House Democrats Wednesday night after the House impeached Trump when she said she would delay transmitting the articles of impeachment and naming the impeachment managers — who will argue the House’s case — until the Senate lays out its procedures for the trial. ‘When we see what they have, we’ll know who and how many we will send over,’ Pelosi said at a news conference Thursday. Pelosi cast the timing as a procedural matter and cited the Senate’s ability to come up with a bipartisan trial plan after President Bill Clinton was impeached.”
Turncoat Dem swoons for Trump, pledges his ‘undying support’ – NJ.com: “New Jersey Rep. Jeff Van Drew, who has voted against President Donald Trump 90 percent of the time while in the U.S. House, promised his ‘undying support’ at the White House Thursday for the president as he joined the Republican Party. Democrats weren’t happy. Van Drew switched sides a day after being one of only two House Democrats to vote against impeaching Trump, a Republican, for abuse of power, and one only three who opposed impeaching him for obstruction of Congress. … On Thursday, Van Drew met in the Oval Office with Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and others on Thursday. ‘Two more things I want to say,’ Van Drew said as reporters looked on. ‘One, you have my undying support.’ ‘Thank you,’ Trump said. ‘Thank you very much.’ ‘And always,’ Van Drew said.”
Mulvaney, already marginalized, prepares for departure – Politico: “Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney is widely expected to leave his current position once the Senate wraps up its impeachment trial and the intense scrutiny of the West Wing settles down, according to five aides and confidants to President Donald Trump. Trump allies and White House aides, who have been nudging the president in recent weeks to find a new leader for the team as it delves into a crucial reelection campaign, have been circulating lists of potential replacements for weeks. Mulvaney no longer wields much control over White House staff. Lately, he has been left out of major personnel and policy decisions, and he is not driving the strategy on impeachment even though he occupies what is historically the most powerful job in the West Wing. ‘He is there. I’ll leave it at that,’ said a Republican close to the White House when asked about Mulvaney’s status. ‘He’s like a kid. His role at the dinner table is to be seen and not heard.’”
Christie-backed PAC provides impeachment air cover for GOP senators – Politico: “Chris Christie is launching a big-money effort aimed at giving Senate Republicans air cover on impeachment — and positioning the former New Jersey governor as a counterweight to liberal billionaire Tom Steyer. The newly formed issue advocacy organization, Right Direction America, is set to begin a seven-figure TV and digital advertising offensive Monday. The nonprofit group will be focused on a half-dozen states where key 2020 Senate races are taking place: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Maine and North Carolina. Christie is looking to offset a multimillion-dollar offensive funded by Steyer, a Democratic presidential candidate and hedge fund executive, who is targeting Senate Republicans over impeachment. Steyer’s organization, Need to Impeach, has spent around $3.5 million across a handful of states pressuring GOP senators.”
Trump rages on evangelical magazine after it backs his removal – WaPo: “The evangelical magazine founded by the late Rev. Billy Graham published a surprising editorial Thursday calling for President Trump’s removal and describing him as ‘a near perfect example of a human being who is morally lost and confused.’ ‘Whether Mr. Trump should be removed from office by the Senate or by popular vote next election — that is a matter of prudential judgment,’ said the piece, written by editor in chief Mark Galli. ‘That he should be removed, we believe, is not a matter of partisan loyalties but loyalty to the Creator of the Ten Commandments.’ Galli, who will retire from the magazine Jan. 3, wrote that the facts leading to Wednesday’s impeachment of Trump are unambiguous. … But the editorial didn’t just call out Trump. It called out his devout Christian supporters. … Trump lashed out at the magazine in a pair of early-morning tweets Friday, calling Christianity Today a ‘far left magazine … which has been doing poorly.’”
PLAY-BY-PLAY
North American trade pact passes in the HouseWSJ
Before Christmas recess Senate confirms 12 more Trump judicial nominees Politico
McMorris Rodgers to reimburse Treasury for misused funds after ethics ruling WaPo
Washington state Rep. Matt Shea suspended from GOP caucus for domestic terrorism ties The Seattle Times
Georgia attorneys defend voter purge, 22,000 reinstated to voting rollsAJC
Pompeo has a new deputy, another sign of impending Senate runAP
AUDIBLE: DUDE
“If you want to talk about the capacity to win, try putting together a coalition to bring you back to office with 80% of the vote as a gay dude in Mike Pence’s Indiana.” – Mayor Pete Buttigieg in response to Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s questioning of his experience during Thursday night’s debate.
ANY GIVEN SUNDAY
This weekend Mr. Sunday will sit down with chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, Marc Short. Watch “Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.” Check local listings for broadcast times in your area.
#mediabuzz – Host Howard Kurtz has the latest take on the week’s media coverage. Watch #mediabuzz Sundays at 11 a.m. ET.
FROM THE BLEACHERS
“I’m a retired federal employee. You say [Thursday:] ‘Certainly Republican incumbents would be worried about showing such generosity to one of the most resented classes of American citizens.’ I actually went looking for web results to support this widespread-resentment idea quantitatively, but didn’t find much. It’s not worth it to me to argue, and it wouldn’t surprise me greatly if you’re right, but — how do you know that?” – Steve Tulloss, Ellicott City, Md.
[Ed. note: I won’t share with you some of the other responses that we had about the new paid family leave benefit for federal workers, but suffice it to say that there is a longstanding antipathy toward federal workers, especially on the American right. We weren’t agreeing, just pointing out that the issue has been fraught before. During the Obama administration, pay raises and sometimes pay freezes for federal workers were often big political fights. Here’s a new, very generous benefit enacted without a peep.]
“Could the Republicans in the House file a lawsuit saying this current impeachment does not rise to the level the Constitution requires and ask the Supreme Court to rule? Love reading your report each day!” – Jim Arthur, Seattle
[Ed. note: Nope. There’s no appealing the judgements of the House in an impeachment. The same goes for the Senate in an impeachment trial. Congress’ power in the matter is absolute. Thanks for reading and taking the time to write!]
“What does it say about my Boomer generation that three of the four impeachments of Presidents have occurred in my lifetime?” – Ron Smith, Larned, Kan.
[Ed. note: You guys have certainly played havoc with American politics over the past 50 or so years. If we look at the arc of events from the 1968 election to today, it’s been a doozy. But taken in the longer view, the upheavals of your era have been modest compared to others, so don’t be too hard on yourselves.]
“Sorry to be so old and out of it but in the ‘Impeachment Circus’ piece [Thursday] you wrote JK! LOLZ! What on earth does that mean?” – Bill Newton, Berkeley, Calif.
[Ed. note: No need to apologize, Mr. Newton! The first one is J(ust) K(idding). LOLZ is a variant of L(aughing) O(ut) L(oud). The Z indicates, for some reason, ironic or mocking laughter.]
Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.
QUACK IN HER HEART AGAIN
Bangor [Maine] Daily News: “The ducks brought together by a Tinder-esque singles ad are hitting it off. Yellow Duck has warmed up to the mallard she was introduced to Sunday, said her owner, Chris Morris, who posted a personals ad on a community bulletin board at the Blue Hill Co-op last week seeking a companion for his lonely duck. ‘… At first she was a little wary of him, but now they follow each other around everywhere.’ Morris posted the ad because Yellow Duck appeared to be feeling blue after a bobcat snatched her two fellow ducks from the Morris’ yard on Dry Moon Lane about three weeks ago. ‘Duck seeking duck,” Morris wrote in the ad. “Lonesome runner duck seeks companion. Partner recently deceased. Serious replies only.’ … The Morris’ named their new duck Mr. Graham… The moniker is an homage to Aubrey Graham, the rapper known as Drake, which is also the term used to describe male ducks that are sexually mature.”
AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“Over the past hundred years, Americans have elected 13 Republican Administrations and 12 Democratic ones. Power could not be more evenly divided. American presidential elections are essentially a flip of the coin. This time the coin landed on its edge.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in Time magazine on Nov. 20, 2000.
Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Original Article

Buttigieg calls out Warren for fundraiser attack: ‘Your net worth is 100 times mine’

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 19 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

The on-going feud between top-tier Democratic presidential nomination rivals Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg over top-dollar donations went from the campaign trail to the primetime primary debate stage on Thursday night.

Warren – who has eschewed fundraisers with top-dollar donors during her presidential bid as she instead focuses nearly entirely on small-dollar grassroots contributions – slammed Buttigieg for holding big bucks fundraisers. Buttigieg quickly shot back that he was the only candidate on the stage who’s net worth isn’t in the millions.

HOLDING BACK NO MORE, WARREN SLAMS TOP TIER RIVALS

The verbal fist-fight kicked off with Warren taking aim at two of her top-tier rivals – Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden.

“Most of the people on this stage run a traditional campaign and that means going back and forth from coast to coast to rich people and people who can put up $5,000 or more in order to have a picture taken … and in order maybe to be considered an ambassador,” Warren emphasized.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, speaks as South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg listens during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, speaks as South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg listens during a Democratic presidential primary debate Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Buttigieg responded by pointing to President Trump’s vast re-election campaign war chest, saying, “They’ve already put together more than $300 million … This is our only chance to defeat Donald Trump and we shouldn’t try to do it with one hand tied behind our back.”

Defending his mingling with top-dollar donors, Buttigieg added that “I’m not going to turn away anyone who wants to help us defeat Donald Trump.”

Warren shot back – highlighting that Buttigieg recently held a fundraiser “that was held in a wine cave full of crystals and served $900 a bottle wine.”

“Billionaires in wine caves should not pick the next president of the United States,” she stressed.

Firing back, Buttigieg said, “I’m literally the only person on this stage who’s not a millionaire or a billionaire.”

“This is the problem with issuing purity tests you cannot yourself pass,” Buttigieg added. “Senator, your net worth is 100 times mine.”

“I do not sell access to my time,” Warren responded. “I don’t meet behind closed doors with big-dollar donors.”

Buttigieg counter attacked, noting that Warren transferred millions of dollars to her presidential campaign that she initially raised at big bucks fundraisers during her 2018 Senate re-election bid.

“Your presidential campaign right now, as we speak, is funded in part by money you transferred having raised it at those exact same big ticket fundraisers you now denounce,” Buttigieg stated. “Did it corrupt you, senator? Of course not.”

The verbal fireworks between the two candidates is the latest chapter in their recent feud.

Thanks to repeated pressure from Warren, Buttigieg a week ago announced that he would open up his closed-door fundraisers to media coverage, similar to what the Biden campaign has done this election cycle.

And Buttigieg's campaign returned fire, urging Warren to release her tax returns from before 2008, when she had corporate clients similar to the giant corporations she now rails against. Warren — under pressure — announced that she earned nearly $2 million from private legal work since 1986.

Warren’s increased aggressiveness in going after her top-tier rivals comes as the one-time co-front-runner in the Democratic nomination race has seen her poll numbers deteriorate the past month in national surveys and, more importantly, in polls in New Hampshire and Iowa, the states that kicks off the primary and caucus presidential nominating calendar.

Original Article

Buttigieg attempts to make inroads in Latino community with multibillion-dollar investment plan

closeDemocrats falling out of love with Pete ButtigiegVideo

Democrats falling out of love with Pete Buttigieg

Reaction and analysis from radio show host Howie Carr.

Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg on Monday unveiled a wide-ranging, multibillion-dollar plan to invest in the Latino community and rollback Trump-era policies, as part of an effort to make inroads with Hispanics.

It comes as Buttigieg is trying to improve his standing with minority voters, including African-Americans and Hispanics. A Quinnipiac University national poll this month found that 29 percent of Latinos view Buttigieg favorably.

“The Latino community is an integral force in pushing our nation toward achieving inclusive, progressive ideals. In so many ways, members of the Latino community uphold and embody the values that make us American,” Buttigieg said in a statement. “Despite these contributions, Latinos have been subjected to relentless and bigoted attacks by this president and his administration.”

DEMOCRATIC DEBATE IN JEOPARDY AMID LABOR DISPUTES AS CANDIDATES EXPRESS FRUSTRATION OVER 'ARTIFICIALLY NARROWED' FIELD

Called “El Pueblo Unido/A People United: A New Era for Latinos,” the proposal’s aim is to tackle the health, educational and economic disparities in an ethnic group that reached a new high in 2018 with 59.9 million people living across the United States, according to the Pew Research Center.

“As president, I will put an end to this administration’s discriminatory policies and work to dismantle the institutional barriers that have denied Latinos the opportunity to belong in their country," Buttigieg said.

Buttigieg is calling for the elimination of the “public charge rule,” a law currently blocked by federal court that would make an immigrant inadmissible to the country if they are deemed to be dependent on federal government assistance.

“Self-sufficiency has been a basic principle of United States immigration law since this country’s earliest immigration statutes,” according to the rule.

Pete Buttigieg struggles to find support from black votersVideo

Buttigieg wrote the federal policy will have a “chilling effect on access to health care,” arguing that “immigrant and mixed-status parents with citizen children are hesitating to enroll their children in Medicaid coverage for fear of deportation.”

The South Bend, Ind., mayor also proposed to examine the effects of a “politicized” 2020 Census to ensure the proposed citizenship question – which was blocked by the Supreme Court in June — did not result in the undercounting of Latino voters.

“The recent push to include citizenship on the census—which we know was done to suppress voter turnout in communities of color—undermines our democracy and could lower the resources allocated to those communities,” Buttigieg wrote.

Buttigieg vowed to “remedy” any negative impacts by working with “federal agencies and Congress to address the effects of any undercount on federal funding.”

Another Trump-era policy Buttigieg calls for reversing is the work requirement for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program, a move that would “likely cut benefits for nearly 700,000 adults.”

A focus of the policy proposal is to address economic inequality. Buttigieg planned to establish a $10 billion fund for entrepreneurs from “underserved communities” in addition to utilizing the Small Business Administration's resources to improve entrepreneurial training and development.

Buttigieg wrote “Latinos are a key part of the economic engine for our country,” adding that he is committed “to investing in Latino-owned businesses and entrepreneurs to level playing field and reduce the racial wealth gap.”

Buttigieg also proposed awarding minority-owned small businesses with 25 percent of the nation’s contracting dollars, totaling $100 billion. He also planned to provide a $1 billion loan guarantee to microlenders with the projection of supporting “over 40,000 new small businesses.”

He also planned to bolster worker protection in industries that are predominately Latino, raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, restore overtime regulations and combat discriminatory business lending.

Another focus of the proposal is to address health inequity in the Latino community. Buttigieg called to “eliminate the five-year waiting period for Green Card holders gaining access to public health insurance programs,” arguing that it will “significantly help Latino immigrants gain access to coverage.”

Buttigieg also touted his "Medicare For All Who Want It" agenda as a way to ensure everyone has access to health care. He also called for increasing investment into mental health services.

“Fueled by this administration’s racist rhetoric and immigration policies, Latino mental health has deteriorated significantly since 2016,” Buttigieg said. “This deterioration has taken place against the backdrop of a broken mental health care system and high stigma towards mental illness in the Latino community.”

He also called to “eliminate disparities in Medicaid funding for Puerto Rico,” which currently receives “block grants that are insufficient in addressing the Medicaid population’s need.” He vowed their Medicaid program will be fully funded.

The policy agenda also outlined a strategy to address environmental inequity.

“Whether it is the disenfranchisement of the people of Puerto Rico or Latino neighborhoods denied access to clean air and water, Latinos in the United States have been burdened for too long by a legacy of systemic discrimination,” Buttigieg said.

Buttigieg met with Hurricane Maria victims in Orlando during a Puerto Rican Roundtable in August, which provided him with input on how to properly address the environmental issues that disproportionally impact minority communities.

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“Climate change, pollution, and environmental degradation often strike Latino communities first, compounding existing inequities in income, health, and disaster preparedness,” Buttigieg wrote. “Half of Latinos live in the most polluted cities in the country, and even more live in one of three states heavily affected by extreme weather events: sea-level rise and hurricanes in Florida, heat waves in Texas, and droughts in California.”

By increasing funding to the Environmental Protection Agency, Buttigieg planned to combat air pollution by strengthening air quality standards and ensure access to clean drinking water through contamination cleanup programs.

Buttigieg also said he wants to recognize and praise Latino culture by establishing a national museum in Washington.

Original Article

Buttigieg releases list of campaign fundraisers after criticism from Warren

closeDemocrats falling out of love with Pete ButtigiegVideo

Democrats falling out of love with Pete Buttigieg

Reaction and analysis from radio show host Howie Carr.

Presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg’s campaign on Friday released a list of people who have raised $25,000 or more for his campaign, amid continued scrutiny from his Democratic primary rivals.

The list is something that the South Bend, Ind. mayor's campaign claims make it “more transparent than any other campaign this cycle.” It includes names such as Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., while Politico reported that other names include an executive vice chairman of the private equity company Blackstone and a partner of McKinsey and Co. — a consulting firm where Buttigieg used to work.

“In addition to releasing these names, which no other current campaign has done, Pete has also opened his fundraisers to the press,” the campaign said in a statement. “He has made public 12 years of tax returns, he has held three multi-day bus tours with reporters that were completely on the record, and he has committed to restoring daily press briefings in the White House.”

BUTTIGIEG RELEASES LIST OF CLIENTS FROM 2007-10 CONSULTING WORK

Politico also reported that a number of former fundraisers for both Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama are on the list.

The release comes amid blistering criticism from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who has taken aim at Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden — without naming them directly — for mingling with wealthy donors.

"They are spending their time in fundraisers with high-dollar donors, selling access to their time for money. Some of them have spent months blocking reporters from entering those fancy, closed-door affairs,” she said at an event this week.

HOLDING BACK NO MORE, WARREN SLAMS TOP RIVALS BIDEN AND BUTTIGIEG

Elizabeth Warren critiques rivals in New Hampshire policy speechVideo

And pointing to Buttigieg, again without naming him, she said the candidate “calls the people who raise a quarter-million dollars for him his ‘National Investors Circle,’ and he offers them regular phone calls and special access. When a candidate brags about how beholden he feels to a group of wealthy investors, our democracy is in serious trouble.”

Following Warren’s address, the Buttigieg campaign returned fire.

“Senator Warren's idea of how to defeat Donald Trump is to tell people who don’t support her that they are unwelcome in the fight and that those who disagree with her belong in the other party. We need to move beyond the politics and divisiveness that is tearing this country apart and holding us back,” Buttigieg senior advisor Lis Smith said in a statement.

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Buttigieg has also faced criticism from the left for an alleged lack of transparency about his work for McKinsey. He responded last week by releasing a summary of his work there and called on the company to release him from the nondisclosure agreement he had signed. It later did, and Buttigieg released a list of clients for whom he had worked.

His clients from 2007 to 2010 included Michigan Blue Cross Blue Shield, Canadian grocery store and retail chain Loblaw’s, Best Buy; the NRDC, EPA and Department of Energy, together, for an energy project; environmental nonprofit the Energy Foundation, the Department of Defense working on building the economies of Irag and Afghanistan, and the U.S. Postal Service.

Fox News' Paul Steinhauser and Morgan Phillips contributed to this report.

Original Article

Holding back no more, Warren slams top rivals Biden and Buttigieg

closeQuestions mount as Elizabeth Warren slips in national pollsVideo

Questions mount as Elizabeth Warren slips in national polls

Did Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren's gamble on Medicare for all fail? Reaction and analysis from former Republican Congressman Connie Mack and Fox News contributor Jessica Tarlov.

MANCHESTER, N.H. – In some of Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s most pointed remarks in her nearly year-long bid for the White House, the Democratic presidential candidate — who in recent weeks has seen her poll numbers slip — fired away on Thursday at two of her top-tier rivals for her party’s nomination.

And while she didn’t name names, it was crystal clear the progressive senator was taking aim at the two leading center-left candidates — former Vice President Joe Biden and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

WARREN SHAKES UP CAMPAIGN ROUTINE AS POLL NUMBERS SLIP

“No other candidate has put out anything close to my sweeping plan to root out Washington corruption," the Massachusetts Democrat touted as she gave a major address on the issue in New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

“Unlike some candidates for the Democratic nomination, I'm not counting on Republican politicians having an epiphany and suddenly supporting the kinds of tax increases on the rich or big business accountability that they have opposed under Democratic presidents for a generation,” Warren said in her speech.

The comment was an indirect jab at Biden, who has repeatedly highlighted on the campaign trail that if elected, he can work with Republicans to reach compromise.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts gives an address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College, on Dec. 12, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts gives an address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College, on Dec. 12, 2019

Warren also took aim at Biden and Buttigieg over their repeated attacks on her push for a government-run "Medicare-for-all" health care system, as well as other progressive policies the populist senator has pushed as she runs for the White House.

“Unlike some candidates for the Democratic nomination, I'm not betting my agenda on the naive hope that if Democrats adopt Republican critiques of progressive policies or make vague calls for unity that somehow the wealthy and well-connected will stand down,” Warren said during her address at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

WARREN PUSHES BACK ON NEW ANALYSIS THAT MATH ON HER WEALTH TAX DOESN'T ADD UP

Warren — who has eschewed fundraisers with top-dollar donors during her presidential bid as she instead focuses nearly entirely on small-dollar grassroots contributions — once again criticized Biden and Buttigieg for mingling with wealthy donors.

"They are spending their time in fundraisers with high-dollar donors, selling access to their time for money. Some of them have spent months blocking reporters from entering those fancy, closed-door affairs,” she said.

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And pointing to Buttigieg without naming him, she said the candidate “calls the people who raise a quarter-million dollars for him his ‘National Investors Circle,’ and he offers them regular phone calls and special access. When a candidate brags about how beholden he feels to a group of wealthy investors, our democracy is in serious trouble.”

Asked after her speech if she’s the only Democratic White House hopeful who can fix what she says is a broken system of government, the senator — again pointing to her rivals — told reporters: "We know how bad the problems are right now. No one is proposing the kinds of solutions that address those problems."

The increased aggressiveness in going after her top-tier rivals appears to be part of Warren’s shaking up of her routine, which also includes altering her format on the campaign trail to include more interaction with voters. The moves come as the one-time co-front-runner in the Democratic nomination race has seen her poll numbers deteriorate the past month in national surveys and, more importantly, in polls in New Hampshire and Iowa, the state that kicks off the primary and caucus presidential nominating calendar.

Thanks to repeated pressure from Warren in recent days, Buttigieg announced on Sunday that he would open up his closed-door fundraisers to media coverage, similar to what the Biden campaign has done this election cycle.

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Following Warren’s address, the Buttigieg campaign returned fire.

“Senator Warren's idea of how to defeat Donald Trump is to tell people who don’t support her that they are unwelcome in the fight and that those who disagree with her belong in the other party. We need to move beyond the politics and divisiveness that is tearing this country apart and holding us back,” Buttigieg senior advisor Lis Smith said in a statement.

Fox News reached out to Biden’s campaign, but they declined to respond to Warren’s criticisms.

Original Article

Warren slips as Buttigieg, Biden, Sanders battle for lead in latest New Hampshire poll

closePundits say Warren slippingVideo

Pundits say Warren slipping

Medicare plan finally draws spotlight.

MANCHESTER, N.H. – A new poll in New Hampshire — the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House — indicates an airtight contest among South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Vice President Joe Biden, and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

And the MassINC Polling Group survey for WBUR released Wednesday also points to a deterioration of support for another top-tier contender for the Democratic presidential nomination – Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

WARREN SHAKES UP CAMPAIGN ROUTINE AS POLL NUMBERS DECLINE

Buttigieg, a one-time longshot who’s soared in polls in Iowa and New Hampshire this autumn, stands at 18 percent among those likely to vote in the Granite State’s Feb. 11 Democratic presidential primary, with Biden at 17 percent and Sanders at 15 percent. Taking into account the survey’s margin of error of plus or minus 4.7 percentage points, the three candidates are basically all tied up for the top spot.

Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg shakes hands with voters after filing to place his name on New Hampshire's primary ballot, in Concord, NH on Oct. 30, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg shakes hands with voters after filing to place his name on New Hampshire's primary ballot, in Concord, NH on Oct. 30, 2019

"What's remarkable about this is how close it remains," MassINC president Steve Koczela noted. “We've got three candidates, all within three points of each other — and Elizabeth Warren not that far behind, right there in that top tier.”

Koczela emphasized that the race for the New Hampshire primary “could go in any direction."

Warren – who like Sanders hails from a neighboring state to New Hampshire – stands at 12 percent in the poll. Since this is the first time the pollsters put out a survey this cycle in the New Hampshire presidential primary, no direct comparisons can be made. But her standing in the new poll is in line with her support in other surveys the past month in the New Hampshire primary. Warren registered from the upper teens to around 30 percent in most Granite State polling conducted from September through early November.

Warren has also seen her standing in the polls in Iowa and nationally deteriorate over the past month. The drop came after increased scrutiny of Warren's plans to pay for and implement a government-run, "Medicare-for-all." The populist senator continued to swear off raising middle-class taxes to pay for the high price tag attached to the single-payer health care system (roughly $20 trillion in new spending over a decade). And she broke with fellow progressive champion and 2020 rival Sanders — who wrote the "Medicare-for-all" bill in the Senate — over implementation. Warren's transition play would delay the immediate end of privately held insurance.

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Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang – who’ve both spent a lot of time meeting voters in New Hampshire – each register at 5 percent in the poll.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and billionaire environmental and progressive activist Tom Steyer each stand at 3 percent, with former New York City mayor and multi-billionaire media mogul Mike Bloomberg at 2 percent. Bloomberg – who jumped into the race late last month – is skipping Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina, the first four states to hold contests in the presidential nominating calendar. Instead, he’s campaigning in the delegate-rich states that vote on Super Tuesday in early March, and beyond.

Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson are each at 1 percent in the survey, with everyone else in the still large field of Democratic White House hopefuls registering less than 1 percent. That includes former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, who last month declared his candidacy.

The poll also indicates that President Trump remains the overwhelming favorite to win New Hampshire’s Republican presidential primary. Trump grabs the backing of 74 percent of those saying they’re likely to vote in the state’s GOP primary. Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld – who’s been campaigning in New Hampshire nearly every week since launching his long-shot primary challenge to Trump in April, stands at 9 percent. Former Rep. Joe Walsh of Illinois – a very vocal Trump critic – registers at 4 percent.

The MassINC Polling Group survey for WBUR was conducted Dec. 3-8, with 442 likely Democratic presidential primary voters in New Hampshire questioned by live telephone operators.

Original Article

Buttigieg releases list of clients from 2007-2010 consulting work

closePete Buttigieg struggles to find support from black votersVideo

Pete Buttigieg struggles to find support from black voters

Buttigieg's difficulties with police and the black community started early in his first term as mayor of South Bend; senior correspondent Mike Tobin reports.

Pete Buttigieg on Tuesday released a list of the corporations he worked for while employed as a management consultant at McKinsey & Company, amid a growing demand for transparency.

For the first two and a half years after his education, Buttigieg took a job with the consulting firm in its Chicago office. The mayor of South Bend, Ind., released the client list one day after McKinsey announced it would release Buttigieg from a non-disclosure agreement due to the “the unique circumstances presented by a presidential campaign,” a spokesperson with the company told Fox News.

His work from 2007 to 2010 consisted of brief stints with different clients doing “mostly research and analysis,” Buttigieg said in a press release. His clients included Michigan Blue Cross Blue Shield, Canadian grocery store and retail chain Loblaw’s, Best Buy; the NRDC, EPA and Department of Energy together for an energy project; environmental nonprofit the Energy Foundation, the Department of Defense working on building the economies of Irag and Afghanistan, and the U.S. Postal Service.

PETE BUTTIGIEG CAN IDENTIFY CLIENTS 2007-10 CONSULTING WORK, FIRM SAYS

“Now, voters can see for themselves that my work amounted to mostly research and analysis. They can also see that I value both transparency and keeping my word. Neither of these qualities are something we see coming out of Washington, especially from this White House. It's time for that to change,” Buttigieg said.

Democrats voiced frustrations at the lack of transparency given what some see as a controversial record from the company. In November, it was reported that McKinsey and Company was under a federal criminal investigation over the way it advises bankrupt companies. Prosecutors are looking into whether the company put profits over its clients’ best interests. McKinsey has also been named in cases against opioid distributors and has worked to help the Trump administration with implementing immigration policies.

In an interview with The Atlantic, Buttigieg said he valued his time working in the private sector.

“Most Americans work in the private sector. And I think the experience I got there served me well. If you’re going to manage the largest economy in the world, it’s probably a good idea that you’ve had a little bit of professional experience looking at a balance sheet or knowing what an income statement is,” he said.

The client list could, if anything, come under fire for Buttigieg’s time with Blue Cross Blue Shield.

“When health insurers bring in consultants for things like ‘assessments’ and ‘cost cutting,’ those are code words for laying off workers, denying customers medical coverage and raising their rates,” Wendell Potter, a former insurance industry executive, told The New York Times.

WARREN SHAKES UP CAMPAIGN STRATEGY, GOES ON ATTACK AS POLL NUMBERS FALL

Buttigieg insisted that none of his work could have led to anyone’s insurance changing or being taken away. The health care firm work was one of his first assignments, which Buttigieg said rendered him far removed from any real decision making.

Blue Cross Blue Shield concurred.

“He was not involved as a leader on that team, but rather as part of the larger consultant group,” spokesperson Helen Stojic told Fox News.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, running against Buttigieg for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, called on Buttigieg to release a full client list from his time at McKinsey after he called on her to release a full list of corporate clients she represented. Warren disclosed a new round of clients Sunday night.

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Ironically, in 1999, Warren — while chairing a committee at Harvard Law looking to improve student experience — hired McKinsey for a contract worth almost $1 million, creating backlash among students at the time.

Original Article

Pete Buttigieg releases summary of consultancy work, calls on company to release him from NDA

closePete Buttigieg struggles to find support from black votersVideo

Pete Buttigieg struggles to find support from black voters

Buttigieg's difficulties with police and the black community started early in his first term as mayor of South Bend; senior correspondent Mike Tobin reports.

Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg is calling on a consulting firm he used to work for to release a list of clients he was assigned, and to release him from his nondisclosure agreement — while releasing a summary of his work there, amid concerns about potential conflicts of interest if he were elected president.

“I believe transparency is particularly important under the present circumstances in our country, which is one of the reasons why I have released all tax returns from my time in the private sector and since,” the South Bend, Ind. mayor said in a statement. “I am today reiterating my request that McKinsey release me from this agreement, and I again make clear that I authorize them to release the full list of clients I was assigned to serve."

BUTTIGIEG DISMISSES BIDEN'S 'ESTABLISHMENT' ENDORSEMENT FROM KERRY

“This company must recognize the importance of transparency in the exceptional case of a former employee becoming a competitive candidate for the U.S. presidency,” he said.

Buttigieg worked for McKinsey & Company between 2007 and 2010, but many of the details of his time there have not been revealed, with Buttigieg citing an NDA he signed. But questions have only increased as Buttigieg has entered the presidential race and moved up the polls — with some showing him in second place behind former Vice President Joe Biden.

The campaign says it inquired about the confidentiality agreement in both June and November — and asked for Buttigieg to be released from it, but says that so far it has not been agreed to by the company.

“The bulk of my work on these teams consisted of doing mathematical analysis, conducting research, and preparing presentations. I never worked on a project inconsistent with my values, and if asked to do so, I would have left the firm rather than participate,” he said.

Tracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contenderVideo

The 37-year-old said in his statement that while some are calling on him to break the agreement, it is important to keep his commitment.

“Now more than ever, however, I also understand the American people deserve to know these kinds of details about their president's background in order to gain and hold that trust. So, I am asking McKinsey to do the right thing in the name of transparency,” he said.

BUTTIGIEG GRABS BACKING OF THREE LEADING OBAMA ERA OFFICIALS

In a press release, the campaign has provided a timeline of his work at the company, without getting into specifics barred by the NDA.

According to that timeline, Buttigieg worked in places ranging from Michigan, where he worked with a non-profit insurance provider in 2007, to California — where he worked with an environmental nonprofit group in 2009.

From 2008-2009, he worked in Connecticut on a project co-sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy, the Natural Resources Defense Council, other environmental groups and several utility companies.

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The pressure is likely to remain on Buttigieg as he remains a top tier candidate. During a presidential forum in Waterloo Friday, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot suggested to Buttigieg, “You should break the NDA,” to distinguish himself from President Trump.

“It's not like I was the CEO,” he replied.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

2020 Democratic long-shot Bennet goes all in on NH, jabs at Buttigieg

closeSen. Michael Bennet on impeachment inquiry, size of Democratic presidential fieldVideo

Sen. Michael Bennet on impeachment inquiry, size of Democratic presidential field

Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bennet joins Dana Perino on 'The Daily Briefing.'

SALEM, N.H. – Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado faces a challenging uphill climb to win the Democratic presidential nomination. But regardless, he said he's going all-in on the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

And the long-shot contender is taking aim again at one of the top tier candidates: South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

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Campaigning in New Hampshire Friday, Bennet highlighted in an interview with Fox News that, “I think I’m far more experienced than he is.”

Bennet, who served as superintendent of the Denver public school system before heading to the Senate in 2009, added that, “like Pete, I got my start at the local level. But my school district had a budget three times the size of his city and since that time I’ve spent 10 years in the Senate, which is enough time to learn how to get some things done but why the biggest things don’t get done in Washington. I think it’s just a very different set of experiences."

Bennet spoke after holding the first of what he pledges are 50 town halls between now and the state’s February 11 presidential primary.

“I think a lot of my time is now going to be devoted to New Hampshire,” he told Fox News.

Asked why he’s emphasizing New Hampshire instead of Iowa, which kicks off the presidential primary and caucus nominating calendar eight days before the Granite State votes, Bennet pointed to New Hampshire’s smaller size and similarities to his home state.

“It’s a little less crowded. It reminds me a lot of Colorado," he said. "It’s a third Republican, a third Democratic, a third independent, which is what Colorado is like. And I think I can get to one end of it to another over and over again, which is why I’ve committed to do 50 town halls between now and the primary.”

Asked where he needs to finish in the primary, the senator would only say “I’ve got to do well here and I hope to do well here.”

Campaign officials told Fox News that they're currently adding to the roughly 10 staffers they have in New Hampshire, and they intend to open two more campaign offices, bringing to three the number they have in the state.

But the campaign added that it's not abandoning Iowa – where it has about 20 staffers.

“Our team in Iowa is intact. It’s a great group of people,” Bennet noted.

Bennet jumped into the race on May 2. His campaign launch was delayed after he was diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent surgery. But after announcing a clean bill of health in mid-April, Bennet moved forward with his White House bid.

He qualified for the first two Democratic presidential debates, held in June and July, but has failed to make the stage since those early showdowns – as he’s fallen short of the polling and fundraising thresholds.

But speaking at a café in Salem, New Hampshire – a large town along with state’s southern border with Massachusetts – Bennet argued that “the debates I don’t think have done very much for the Democratic Party. I think they’ve sort of played into Donald Trump’s hands. I can see why it’s entertaining and part of what we do but it shouldn’t be the central way we conduct this election.”

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado campaigns at a cafe in Salem, NH, on Dec. 6, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado campaigns at a cafe in Salem, NH, on Dec. 6, 2019

And he took aim at the top tier contenders for the nomination, saying “we’ve got a problem on our hands because I think people are deeply unconvinced that the leading candidates in this race can beat Donald Trump. And that’s the No. 1 issue for people.”

Asked by the crowd how he can compete with the candidates with bigger name identification and bigger campaign cash war chests, Bennet pointed to New Hampshire’s tradition of late-deciding voters.

“Look, you guys are just starting to make up your minds here, in New Hampshire, to say nothing of the rest of the country,” he noted.

That tradition is reflected in the latest polls in the state’s Democratic presidential primary, with a high percentage of undecided voters – or voters who are backing a candidate but saying they could change their minds by primary day in February.

Original Article

Buttigieg dismisses Biden’s ‘establishment’ endorsement from Kerry

closeTracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contenderVideo

Tracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contender

Buttigieg's campaign emphasizes his time as a naval intelligence officer in Afghanistan and his experience as a decision maker in the mayor's office; Mike Tobin reports from South Bend, Indiana.

HENNIKER, N.H. – Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is downplaying rival Joe Biden’s "Washington establishment" endorsement from former Secretary of State John Kerry.

“I have never been part of the Washington establishment and I recognize that there are relationships among senators who have been together on Capitol Hill as long as I’ve been alive and that is what it is,” Buttigieg said Thursday in an interview in New Hampshire.

The South Bend, Indiana mayor made his comments soon after the former vice president’s campaign announced the Kerry endorsement. Kerry – the Democrats’ 2004 presidential nominee – was a longtime senator from Massachusetts who later served as America’s top diplomat during President Barack Obama’s second term. Kerry and Biden have a long history of working together, first in the Senate and later in the Obama administration.

Buttigieg worked on Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign.

JOHN KERRY ENDORSES BIDEN FOR PRESIDENT, SAYS TRUMP HAS 'BROKEN APART' COUNTRY

The rollout of the endorsement by Kerry – who will campaign with Biden in Iowa on Friday and in New Hampshire on Sunday – came hours after Buttigieg scored the backing of three leading former Obama officials.

“I will say one of the reasons why I appreciate the endorsement of the folks who came through today is we’re talking about people who understand the presidency very intimately and very well and for them to agree that I’m the right person to step into that office and that role at a time like this really validates what we’re saying as a campaign,” Buttigieg emphasized in the interview.

The candidate has highlighted similarities between Obama’s historic 2008 White House campaign and his own 2020 presidential bid. Buttigieg notes that both he and Obama were new faces for most Americans, and that he is following the former president’s footsteps in running on a positive message of unity and hope.

But he seemed to downplay the ties when asked by Fox News.

“I think every campaign in every era is different and I recognized that while I’m flattered by a lot of comparisons and see some parallels with 2008, we’re also at a different moment,” he noted.

BUTTIGIEG GRABS BACKING OF THREE LEADING OBAMA ERA OFFICIALS

Biden, of course, was also a key player in the 2008 general election campaign. Obama chose Biden – a senator from Delaware who unsuccessfully ran earlier that cycle for their party’s presidential nomination – as his running mate.

Once the longest of long shots for the nomination, Buttigieg soared to top-tier status in recent months as he's surged in the early voting state polls and hauled in tons of campaign cash. Biden — along with progressive Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts – is in that top tier of candidates along with Buttigieg.

Thanks in part to the eight years he served as Obama’s vice president, Biden enjoys a large advantage over his rivals when it comes to support from black voters, a crucial component of the Democratic presidential primary electorate.

Buttigieg acknowledged Biden’s advantage among black voters but predicted it would not last.

“It’s no secret there’s one candidate who has a major advantage right now among African American voters, but I don’t think that’s permanent and I think it’s our job to go out there and earn our share of the vote,” Buttigieg said.

Buttigieg, whose lack of support among black voters has been well documented in media reports, has stepped up his outreach efforts this autumn.

Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg holds a town hall at New England College in Henniker, NH on Dec, 5, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg holds a town hall at New England College in Henniker, NH on Dec, 5, 2019

Buttigieg arrived in New Hampshire the morning after a gathering of black supporters at an event in his hometown of South Bend, Indiana was interrupted by a protester in a "Black Lives Matter" shirt. Video of the near violent incident went viral on social media.

Buttigieg explained that “there is a lot of negativity that spills over from Twitter that doesn’t quite reflect real life but sometimes ends up having real-life consequences. What we saw the other night was a good example.”

And he seemed to partially point fingers at a rival campaign saying, “You had a group of highly respected African American elected officials and other supporters talking about what we’ve been doing in the community and then somebody propelled by an opposition campaign literally tried to take the mic from an African American leader.

"It shows the work that we’ve got to do to make sure a sense of common purpose is established but also to make sure the truth gets out there and that’s what we’re being very intentional with in this campaign,” he said.

Original Article

Buttigieg lands backing of an influential progressive veterans group

closeTracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contenderVideo

Tracking Pete Buttigieg's rise from relatively unknown Midwestern mayor to Democratic presidential contender

Buttigieg's campaign emphasizes his time as a naval intelligence officer in Afghanistan and his experience as a decision maker in the mayor's office; Mike Tobin reports from South Bend, Indiana.

An organization that describes itself as the largest progressive group of veterans in the nation is backing South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg in his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

VoteVets.org announced on Wednesday its endorsement of Buttigieg, who took a leave of absence in 2014 to be deployed to Afghanistan, where he served as an intelligence officer from the U.S. Naval Reserve.

BUTTIGIEG CAMP HITS BACK AFTER BIDEN ACCUSES BUTTIGIEG 'STOLE' HIS HEALTH CARE PLAN

Emphasizing that beating President Trump in the 2020 election is “the number one priority,” Iraq War veteran and VoteVets chairman Jon Soltz said, “We need a candidate who will win. Bar none, Pete gives us the best shot at doing just that. It is time to rally around him, and stop the walking, talking national security threat that is Donald Trump.”

Soltz highlighted that “Pete is also someone who has the experience, as a war veteran, to be an exemplary Commander in Chief, because he understands and has experienced the unique global security challenges we face right now, and the has the personal understanding of our veterans’ needs.”

The 13-year-old group – which claims to represent roughly 700,000 veterans – has long backed veterans in congressional races, but this is their first endorsement in a presidential primary.

VoteVets announced it would be immediately contributing to Buttigieg’s campaign and would use its social media networks and email list to support his White House bid.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

"I'm honored to have this endorsement from my fellow veterans as we seek to take on our nation's most urgent challenges and pick up the pieces and put the country back together after Trump," said the 37-year-old candidate.

"In uniform, I learned that when Americans from different backgrounds are brought together for a common purpose, we form the strongest fighting force in the world," he added.

Once the longest of long shots for the nomination, Buttigieg soared to top-tier status as he's surged in the early voting state polls and hauled in tons of campaign cash.

Buttigieg is one of two veterans in the large field of Democratic White House contenders. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, an officer in the Hawaii National Guard, served a tour of duty in Iraq.

Original Article

Biden retakes lead in new poll as Warren’s numbers plummet, Buttigieg gains ground

closeJoe Biden hints at potential female running matesVideo

Joe Biden hints at potential female running mates

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden says he's considering four possible female running mates, but won't reveal their names; reaction from Brad Woodhouse, former DNC communications director, and Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union.

A new national poll shows former Vice President Joe Biden retaking the lead in the Democratic presidential primary race, as Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts sees her numbers slashed by half.

Despite some gaffes on the campaign trail and a mixed result from last week’s Democratic debate, Biden leads the field with 24 percent of the vote, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg is in second with 16 percent, while Warren trails in third with 14 percent and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has 13 percent.

BUTTIGIEG FENDS OFF ATTACKS, TAKES ON FAR-LEFT FLANK AT DEBATE; BIDEN STUMBLES WITH HARRIS GAFFE

"Biden is back on top of the pack but now there is a three-way race for second,” Quinnipiac University polling analyst Tim Malloy said in a statement. “Buttigieg has broken into the top tier, apparently at the expense of Warren, who has taken a dive after being hammered for being too far left on health care and other issues.”

Elizabeth Warren answers questions relating to her newly released immigration policyVideo

Warren’s third place is a far cry from the 28 percent she pulled in an Oct. 24 poll, where she led Biden by seven points, Sanders by 13 and Buttigieg by 18.

In the recent Quinnipiac poll, no other Democratic candidate running for president was able to crack double digits. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who just entered the race, received 3 percent, along with Sens. Kamala Harris of California and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota.

2020 hopeful Pete Buttigieg surging in IowaVideo

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Biden continues to poll favorably when it comes to “electability” and the chance to beat President Trump next November; 46 percent of Democratic voters and independent voters who lean Democratic seeing him as the candidate who has the best chance of winning against the current White House occupant. Warren and Sanders each get 10 percent when it comes to electability, while Buttigieg pulls in 6 percent.

Original Article

Bernie, Warren, Buttigieg, Biden knotted in N.H.

closeThe Greg Gutfeld Show - Saturday, November 23Video

The Greg Gutfeld Show – Saturday, November 23

On today’s episode of The Greg Gutfeld Show, Greg Gutfeld and his guests talk about the House Impeachment hearings week in review. They also discuss the 2020 Democratic debate.

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On the roster: Bernie, Warren, Buttigieg, Biden knotted in N.H. – Detroit Democrat does impeachment flip-flop-flip – Audible: How it’s done – The car that caught the dog
BERNIE, WARREN, BUTTIGIEG, BIDEN KNOTTED IN N.H.
Boston Globe: “A new Suffolk University/Boston Globe poll of likely New Hampshire Democratic primary voters shows a tight, four-way contest, with Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont on top but statistically tied with Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., and former vice president Joe Biden. It has been decades since this many candidates have jostled for the lead so soon before a New Hampshire presidential primary. On Monday, longtime New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner officially scheduled the vote for Feb. 11. The survey found Sanders, who won the New Hampshire primary in 2016, leading the field with 16 percent, including those who lean toward the candidate. Warren had 14 percent, Buttigieg had 13 percent, and Biden had 12 percent. All other candidates, including former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick, who jumped in the race this month, were in single digits. The poll suggested little about this race is set in stone.”
Senior Biden staffer, Latina adviser quits campaign – Politico: “A senior Joe Biden campaign staffer in charge of outreach to Latino, African-American and women’s groups has quit her post, telling two allies she was frustrated over her lack of input and with the presidential candidate’s immigration rhetoric. Vanessa Cárdenas, the most senior Latina Biden staffer, had been serving as national coalitions director since the campaign formally announced its existence April 25. She resigned last week and has since changed her bio on Twitter to say she was ‘formerly with @joebiden.’ Cárdenas did not return a call or text message, but two friends familiar with her thinking told POLITICO that she felt the campaign wasn’t heeding her advice on immigration as she tried to reach out to Latino groups that have had longstanding concerns with the former vice president’s rhetoric and record stemming from the Obama administration.”
Bloomy’s low-key, high-dollar launch – NYT: “Michael R. Bloomberg started his campaign at a hushed diner in downtown Norfolk, Va. … before strolling to a nearby hotel ballroom and making an efficient statement before a bank of television cameras. Accompanied by a small platoon of aides, including two of his former deputy mayors from New York City and a security team that flitted around a downtown waterfront nearly barren of pedestrians, Mr. Bloomberg described himself as a political pragmatist skilled at wielding his wealth to win elections. … If Mr. Bloomberg’s first in-person appearance as a presidential candidate lacked something in organic political energy, he has already jolted the race through the sheer scale of his political spending, stunning the Democratic political establishment and stirring an outcry from the party’s populist wing.”
Deval Patrick has a long way to go – Politico: “To call Deval Patrick’s campaign a shoestring operation would be insulting to shoestrings. Attend a Patrick event and there’s not a bumper sticker or pin to be found, let alone organizers with clipboards collecting names of would-be voters. His ground game looks to be nonexistent: The entire campaign appears to consist of a handful of volunteers and one publicly announced staffer, campaign manager Abe Rakov. In comparison, other campaigns have several hundred paid staffers and dozens of offices combined — and that’s just in New Hampshire. Patrick has spent the first dozen days of his campaign trying to persuade senior Democratic leaders in the early voting states to take him seriously. They want to give the former Massachusetts governor with an inspirational life story and friendship with Barack Obama the benefit of the doubt. But Patrick has a way to go before they fully buy in.”
Ryan Lizza: Waiting for Obama – Politico: “The post-presidency of Obama is unlike any other. Many presidents have had to navigate the tricky politics of leaving office when a president from the other party takes over. And plenty of presidents have had to grapple with the delicate situation of their vice president seeking a promotion. But Obama has to grapple with both situations simultaneously, and under unprecedented conditions: Obama is under near daily personal assault from the president, who has tweeted about him relentlessly in the past three years, often accusing him and his top officials of an array of crimes, a situation that no ex-president has faced or even imagined.”
THE RULEBOOK: IT’S IN THE DETAILS
“THE erection of a new government, whatever care or wisdom may distinguish the work, cannot fail to originate questions of intricacy and nicety; and these may, in a particular manner, be expected to flow from the establishment of a constitution founded upon the total or partial incorporation of a number of distinct sovereignties.” – Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 82
TIME OUT: PLEASE LEAVE A MESSAGE AFTER THE TONE
Smithsonian: “In the spring of 1900, twenty-four years after Alexander Graham Bell introduced the telephone, a Danish inventor named Valdemar Poulsen unveiled the ‘telegraphone’ at the Exposition Universelle in Paris. It was an engineering marvel—Poulsen recorded sound on a wire using nothing but a magnet, similar to the principle that underlies computer hard drives—and it was a minor social miracle, an antidote to Bell’s constantly ringing telephone. The telegraphone was the world’s first answering machine. … Not everyone was overjoyed. AT&T, which held a monopoly on the U.S. phone system and forbid the use of third-party technology, suppressed the innovation for more than half a century, according to research by Mark Clark, a historian of technology. … A big concern was that the device would be used not just to answer calls but to record conversations. The American Telegraphone Company, which had attempted unsuccessfully to market the machine, claimed that AT&T feared the device’s ability to record calls.”
Flag on the play? – Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM with your tips, comments or questions.
SCOREBOARD
DEMOCRATIC 2020 POWER RANKING
Biden: 27.6 points (no change from last wk.)
Warren: 22.6 points (no change from last wk.)
Sanders: 17.6 points no change from last wk.)
Buttigieg: 7.6 points (no change from last wk.)
Harris: 3.2 points (no change from last wk.)
[Averages include: Monmouth University, NBC News/WSJ, ABC News/WaPo, Fox News and IBD.]
TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE
Average approval: 44 percent
Average disapproval: 52.6 percent
Net Score: -8.6 percent
Change from one week ago: ↑ 2.8 points
[Average includes: CNN: 43% approve – 53% disapprove; NPR/PBS/Marist: 44% approve – 51% disapprove; Gallup: 43% approve – 54% disapprove; Monmouth University: 45% approve – 52% disapprove; NBC News/WSJ: 45% approve – 53% disapprove.]
WANT MORE HALFTIME REPORT?
You can join Chris and Brianna every day on Fox Nation. Go behind-the-scenes of your favorite political note as they go through the must-read headlines of the day right from their office – with plenty of personality. Click here to sign up and watch!
DETROIT DEMOCRAT DOES IMPEACHMENT FLIP-FLOP-FLIP
Detroit Metro Times: “Rep. Brenda Lawrence [D-Mich.] is walking back statements she made about impeaching President Trump in an interview with Charlie LeDuff. In a written statement to Metro Times, Lawrence said she still supports impeaching Trump but censure may be a more viable option because of Republicans’ opposition to impeachment. ‘I was an early supporter for impeachment in 2017,’ Lawrence says. ‘The House Intelligence Committee followed a very thorough process in holding hearings these past two weeks. The information they revealed confirmed that this President has abused the power of his office, therefore I continue to support impeachment. However, I am very concerned about Senate Republicans and the fact that they would find this behavior by the President acceptable.’”
PLAY-BY-PLAY
Judge rules McGahn must comply with House subpoena – WaPo
SupCo shields Trump’s financial records from House for now –WaPo
Trump signs bill making animal cruelty a federal crimeFox News
Trump donates 3rd-quarter salary toward efforts to help nation’s opioid crisisAP
Mortality rates skyrocket for Americans 25 to 34, drugs, alcohol, suicide key driversWaPo
AUDIBLE: HOW IT’S DONE
Chris Wallace is a damn good reporter. He asked me a very direct question. He asked me about hacking the DNC computer. I heard him say I thought he'd said meddling in the election. Chris was right. I was wrong. So let me be clear. Russia hacked the DNC computer. I have no evidence whatsoever that Ukraine did it.” – Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., on “America’s Newsroom” taking a do-over for statements he made on “Fox News Sunday.”
FROM THE BLEACHERS
“Upon hearing yet another of Joe Biden’s continuing verbal gaffes, I’m reminded that when Gov. Rick Perry had ONE instance of ‘brain fade’ during a presidential debate, it did great damage to his campaign and his viability as a candidate. But when we hear Biden’s frequent brain fades, during debates and everywhere else, Democrats and the MSM shrug and say, ‘Oh that’s just good ol’ Uncle Joe.’ Doesn’t seem like a level playing field to me – what was levied against the goose ought to be levied against the gander. Short-term memory loss is often a fact of life as we age – OK, fine! But should someone who continuously exhibits those symptoms be in the most powerful position on the planet? Should that person be the commander-in-chief?” – Dave Wittnebert, Seneca, S.C.
[Ed. note: I thiiiiink you may be shading the past in a favorable light for the former secretary of energy. Perry burst into the 2012 primary race as a frontrunner. When he declared in August of 2011 he was already running even with Mitt Romney. By mid-September, Perry was way out in front with a double-digit lead on his fellow former governor. But then the cracks started to show. Aside from some spectacularly bad political moves – dissing Iowa, feuding with the Bush family, etc. – Perry was a simply awful debater. One performance in September in which Perry tried to attack Romney for inconstancy turned into such a debacle that commentators openly wondered about his health. In October, Perry seemed to rally for a bit, but his steep descent had already begun. By the time of the “brain fade” you reference in November, Perry was tied for fifth and headed for the exits. When he couldn’t remember the third federal agency he had called to shutter – ironically, the one he would eventually lead – it was bad enough. But that he stood there vapor locking so long and then eventually said, Heaven help us, “Oops,” it wasn’t instant disqualification. It was the coda to a long symphony of Perry’s ill-conceived, poorly executed presidential campaign. (He would later reveal that the after effects of intense back surgery the summer before his entry had been worse than he had admitted.) Biden takes a lot of abuse for his rambling, discursive answers and the anxiety-inducing inability to land answers. But that’s been his thing for 40 years. Biden was a notorious blarney and bluster merchant when he first ran in 1988. So I don’t know how much of it is media bias or, as Perry did in his subsequent 2012 candidacy and federal service, what another former Texas governor might call “the soft bigotry of low expectations.”]
“I am puzzled by the whole quid pro quo/bribery charge against Trump for calling for an investigation of Biden. If the investigation showed that there was no wrongdoing, wouldn’t that benefit Biden and be detrimental to Trump? So, those who believe the President urging Zelensky to investigate Biden was bribery (i.e., a benefit to Trump for a granted favor) must assume the investigation would find that Biden is guilty of wrongdoing.” – Pat Conroy, West Lake Hills, Texas
[Ed. note: Why would you ever, ever, ever want a sitting president to directly involve himself in a criminal or corruption matter involving his leading political rival? Instead, one would want the sitting president to keep himself as far removed from the process on that matter more than any except for those that might involve himself or those close to him. Members of the House may get the chance to decide whether what Trump did merits removal and they can debate the names they want to use for specific conduct. But that isn’t about whether Biden did or didn’t do the things Trump claims. The conduct at issue in Congress is about Trump involving himself personally and through his personal attorney in the process. Maybe think of it this way: police or judicial misconduct isn’t dependent on whether the suspect is guilty or not. The two issues are separable.]
Share your color commentary: Email us at HALFTIMEREPORT@FOXNEWS.COM and please make sure to include your name and hometown.
THE CAR THAT CAUGHT THE DOG
WPTV: “What dog doesn’t love a car ride? Better yet- a ride behind the wheel? Some Port St. Lucie neighbors watched a dog get the ride of a lifetime. It was stuck inside a car spinning in reverse for nearly an hour. Neighbors say the dog did not seem to mind at all. ‘I figured ‘how the heck did they manage to do that?’’ said neighbor Anna Sabol. Sabol said she looked out her window Thursday morning and a police car grabbed her attention. … She realized they were all responding to a grey sedan spinning in reverse in a cul-de-sac. The one occupant inside was a Black Labrador. … Police say the dog’s owner had briefly stepped out of the car when the dog somehow knocked the car into reverse. Police say they were able to stop the joyride by punching the passcode into the driver’s side door. But, not before the dog took out a mailbox, a trash can, and moved some bricks in front of a home. … Police say the dog was not hurt. No neighbors were hurt. … Instead, they say the dog seemed pretty happy about his first, and likely last, solo drive.”
AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“The sun rises regularly, too, but so often that we can't help being dulled to the wonder of its rhythm. And what rhythms, beyond that of the familiar year, really touch us?” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in the Washington Post on Dec. 13, 1985.
Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Original Article

Buttigieg proposes long-term care benefits for older Americans, protecting Social Security ‘forever’

closeButtigieg receives frontrunner treatment at 5th Democratic debateVideo

Buttigieg receives frontrunner treatment at 5th Democratic debate

Political analyst Ron Meyer and liberal analyst Cathy Areu react to the fifth Democratic debate.

Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg on Monday rolled out a plan to “promote dignity and security in retirement” through additional regular payments to older Americans, along with imposing a payroll tax on the wealthiest Americans to “protect Social Security forever.”

The South Bend, Ind., mayor said his father had been admitted to a hospital last winter for an undisclosed illness, and died this past January. He said a social worker told him the best option for long-term care would be to deplete their assets in order to qualify for Medicaid.

The Democrat said he asked himself, “Is that how this works in America?”

On Monday, his campaign announced plans to establish Long-Term Care America, a program providing people 65 and older with a benefit of $90 per day. “Over 11 million will receive benefits from the program throughout their lifetime,” according to the proposal.

Buttigieg, a self-described progressive who has resisted calls from the far left to embrace “Medicare-for-all,” also vowed to preserve Medicare Advantage – a private health-care plan – for those favoring it.

“There’s no dignity in retirement without being able to choose the health-care plan that’s right for you,” Buttigieg said.

The candidate said he would “revitalize the private long-term care insurance market” by bolstering support for caregivers — which would involve raising the minimum wage to a $15 an hour, expanding training programs, ensuring the possibility for career advancement and allowing home-care workers to unionize.

Many Americans have acted as at-home caregivers for their loved ones at their own expense. Buttigieg aimed to reduce that burden by providing “12 weeks of paid family leave, providing credit toward Social Security for family and other unpaid caregivers, and improving support by funding and training long-term care navigators and creating community-based service hubs,” according to the plan. Under the proposal, Buttigieg will require the Social Security administration to recognize at-home, unpaid caregiving as work, thus providing a credit toward benefits.

COUNCILMAN FROM BUTTIGIEG'S HOMETOWN ENDORSES BIDEN

In addition, Buttigieg aimed to secure the solvency of Social Security by imposing a payroll tax on individuals earning above $250,000 a year. He also vowed to “protect Social Security forever” by working with Congress to periodically increase taxes on the nation’s top earners, adding that benefits would increase over time to ensure seniors don’t fall beneath the poverty line.

Buttigieg also called for a public-option 401 (k) “with low fees and smart investment options so that all workers have the opportunity to supplement their Social Security benefits if they choose with employer contributions,” adding that it will “expand retirement savings among the 62 million workers locked out of tax-preferred retirement savings, and enable the typical worker to retire with over $500,000.”

Will Pete Buttigieg get frontrunner treatment during fifth Democratic debate?Video

Buttigieg said he’s “determined to usher in a new era for older Americans that upholds the unshakable promise that every American should be able to maintain a decent standard of living when they retire.”

Older adults are projected to outnumber children for the first time in United States history by 2035, according to a 2018 report by the U.S. Census Bureau. In addition, the nonpartisan, nonprofit Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has predicted Social Security will become insolvent by 2035.

Buttigieg’s plan mirrored legislation put forth by other Democrats vying for the presidential nomination.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., introduced the Social Security Expansion Act in February with support from Sens. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Cory Booker, D-N.J.

Their proposal, however, aimed higher, pledging to extend the solvency of Social Security through 2071 by also lifting the earnings cap, subjecting those raking in over $250,000 a year to the Social Security payroll tax.

A chief economist at Moody’s Analytics reviewed Buttigieg’s proposal. Dr. Mark Zandi said the plan would secure the solvency of Social Security through 2051, adding that it will reduce the federal deficit by $1.2 trillion over 10 years.

“The reforms you have proposed will put the Social Security system on sounder financial ground, extending its solvency by more than 30 years into the middle of this century,” Zandi wrote to the presidential candidate. “More reforms will eventually be needed, but your reforms address the system’s financial problem, which will be a relief to a financially precious low and middle-income Americans.”

Pete Buttigieg uses stock image to promote plans for black AmericaVideo

President Trump has not issued a plan to specifically address the impending insolvent system but said during the 2016 campaign that a thriving economy will secure Social Security by boosting the money paid into it.

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“The key to preserving Social Security and other programs that benefit AARP members is to have an economy that is robust and growing,” Trump said in a statement to the AARP in June 2016. “For too long Americans have had a great deal of uncertainty in their lives, and the reforms I will bring to D.C. will remove that uncertainty and will restore confidence in the American economy.”

Trump has fulfilled his promise of providing a tax cut, signing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in 2017, which Democrats have criticized for benefiting corporations and the richest Americans at the expense of the rest of the country.

Original Article

Buttigieg plays up blue-collar cred: ‘Literally the least wealthy person on this stage’

closePete Buttigieg moves past Democratic presidential rivals in new Iowa pollVideo

Pete Buttigieg moves past Democratic presidential rivals in new Iowa poll

25 percent of likely Iowa Caucus goers pick Mayor Peter Buttigieg as their first choice in a new poll; Peter Doocy reports from Atlanta.

ATLANTA — South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg has been working to differentiate himself from the other top-tier Democratic candidates in terms of policy differences, but during Wednesday night's debate, he pointed to a personal distinction — namely, his relatively modest means.

Buttigieg referred to a Forbes Magazine article that listed all of the presidential candidates according to their net worth.

"I'm literally the least wealthy person on this stage," Buttigieg said.

SANDERS WARNS 'WE WILL LOSE THIS ELECTION' IF DEMS FOCUS SOLELY ON TRUMP

Buttigieg likely was referring to a Forbes piece published in August 2019. According to that article, the Democrat at the top of the list was Tom Steyer with a net worth of $1.6 billion. The reported median: $2 million. Buttigieg trailed all of them with an estimated net worth of $100,000.

President Trump, meanwhile, was listed as nearly twice as wealthy as Steyer with an estimated $3.1 billion. Buttigieg pointed out the sharp contrast between the two.

While Trump has been known for spending time at golf courses bearing his name, Buttigieg stated, "I don't even golf."

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Of the candidates still in the race, Buttigieg was one of just three on the list with a net worth of less than $1 million. The article listed former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro at $700,000 and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, at $500,000.

Buttigieg's fellow front-runners, former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., were listed at $9 million, $12 million and $2.5 million, respectively.

Original Article

Pete Buttigieg slammed on Twitter for ‘insensitive’ Holocaust memorial photo: ‘This guy’

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 20

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 20 are here. Check out what's clicking on FoxNews.com

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg is being slammed – and also defended – after a 2017 Instagram post of him at a Holocaust memorial in Berlin, with the caption "This guy," resurfaced Sunday on Twitter.

The Democratic presidential candidate’s husband, Chasten Buttigieg, posted the photo of Buttigieg at what appeared to be the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, in Germany's capital.

Users on Twitter called the photo and caption “tone-deaf,” “inappropriate, “tasteless” and “disrespectful.”

"Honestly, I think it's more the, uh, caption than the picture itself," one Twitter user wrote. "Something about implying how dreamy your husband is with a Holocaust memorial as the backdrop comes off as a bit tone-deaf, so it's actually a decent microcosm of the Buttigieg campaign."

BUTTIGIEG SLAMMED BY TRUMP CAMPAIGN'S BLACK OUTREACH INITIATIVE: 'WHAT HAVE YOU DONE FOR THE BLACK COMMUNITY?'

NBC reporter Ben Kesslen first tweeted a screenshot of the post, writing “is this….at the holocaust memorial in berlin….” on Sunday.

Although considered disrespectful, tourists frequently take photos at Holocaust memorials and concentration camps like Auschwitz.

Not everyone was offended by the photo. Some Twitter users saw the picture as harmless and the criticism politically motivated.

"He looks more respectful than most people who visit the memorial nowadays," one user wrote. "Anyone who's been there can attest."

"As someone who lost relatives in the Holocaust, including my great grandparents, your using this to smear Pete is absolutely appalling to me. Try a little self-reflection," another user commented on Kesslen's post.

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Buttigieg's campaign did not immediately respond to Fox News' request for comment.

Original Article

Buttigieg slammed by Trump campaign’s black outreach initiative: ‘What have you done for the black community?’

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 19

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 19 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

President Trump's campaign slammed South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg on Tuesday, after it was revealed that the Democrat's presidential campaign several stock images — including one of a Kenyan woman — to illustrate his Douglass Plan, laying out reformation efforts intended to battle racial inequality in America.

"Mayor Pete’s 'Douglass Plan' is not only named after America's most prominent Black Republican but also is incredibly misleading and presumptuous," Trump's senior campaign adviser Katrina Pierson said in a statement Tuesday. Pierson had led the outreach initiative Black Voices for Trump.

"His lack of awareness to the current state of the black community, the historical figure his 'plan' is named after, and inability to get real support from blacks in South Carolina shows how out of touch he is. Presidents don’t talk, they act. What have you done for the black community in your city, Pete?"

BUTTIGIEG WEBSITES ON 'BLACK AMERICA' PLANS USED STOCK PHOTOS OF MINORITIES

The remarks came a day after the irrelevant image was spotted by The Intercept’s Ryan Grim, highlighting a larger issue that Buttigieg has faced while struggling to appeal to African American and Latino voters heading into the primaries.

"Donald Trump is in no position to give anyone advice on combating racism, but we're glad to have another chance to talk about Frederick Douglass and his legacy," Nina Smith, a campaign spokesperson for Buttigieg, told Fox News on Tuesday. "Pete was proud to name his comprehensive plan to dismantle systemic racism after one of America's most recognized leaders, Mr. Douglass, with input and support from his descendants."

Buttigieg's campaign rolled out the proposal – named the Douglass Plan after the abolitionist and activist Frederick Douglass – this past July. The plan called for changes to the nation’s health, education and criminal justice systems to combat institutional racism.

Although campaigns have long used generic stills and clips in ads and elsewhere, Buttiegieg's blunder occurred just as the campaign initiated new efforts to court black voters with a series of events surrounding Wednesday’s presidential primary debate in Atlanta.

Buttigieg struggling with minority outreachVideo

Buttigieg soared to top-tier status in recent weeks, particularly in Iowa, but still has struggled with black voters, composing roughly one-fifth of the primary electorate.

The campaign defended the plan despite the numerous hurdles that followed the rollout, which included backlash from lawmakers and 2020 presidential contenders in his own party. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., called the photo debacle a "big mistake" that Buttigieg "is going to have to answer for."

"Pete's Douglass Plan, which was developed with black leaders and activists, would make unprecedented investments in entrepreneurship, education, homeownership, health and justice," Smith told Fox News. "Pete knows it is not enough to simply replace racist policies with neutral ones; he is campaigning on the need to make intentionally anti-racist investments. Pete also knows it is not enough to simply beat Donald Trump; we need to elect someone who will pick up the pieces and bring this nation back together. The contrast will be very clear when Pete stands across from Donald Trump on the debate stage next fall."

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The most recent Fox News Poll taken between Oct. 27 and Oct. 30 showed Trump and Buttigieg roughly tied, 41 percent each, in a 2020 general-election matchup.

Other national polling data from the same period, including a Real Clear Politics average, showed Buttigieg pulling ahead of Trump by four percentage points– 46.8 to 42.3 percent respectively.

Fox News' Matt Leach, Paul Steinhauser and Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Original Article

What would Buttigieg’s path look like?

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Buttigieg struggling with minority outreach

Reaction and analysis from Guy Benson and Ethan Bearman.

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On the roster: What would Buttigieg’s path look like? – As impeachment grinds on, voters dig in – Congress kicks can on spending until Dec. 20 – Audible: Audible, indeed – Three wise guys wanted for questioning
WHAT WOULD BUTTIGIEG’S PATH LOOK LIKE?

FiveThirtyEight: [If Pete Buttigieg] winds up pulling disproportionately from [Elizabeth Warren], it could make for a more complicated race. A world where Buttigieg wins both Iowa and New Hampshire is one where Warren will have finished second (or worse) in two early states that, on paper, look tailor-made for her. The underwhelming performances could drain her support among two key elements of her base — wonky-but-not-ideological college-educated whites, who could switch to Buttigieg, and devoted progressives, who could switch to [Bernie Sanders]. In fact, the Selzer poll already showed signs that Iowa liberals were leaving Warren for Sanders; if that happens nationwide, the Democratic primary could exit Super Tuesday as a three-way race between [Joe Biden] as the candidate of nonwhite voters, Buttigieg as the candidate of party elites and Sanders as the candidate of the left.”
Dems turn to big donors to blunt Trump’s early cash advantage – WaPo: “Democratic groups financed by wealthy donors have ratcheted up their spending in recent weeks as party operatives have become concerned that President Trump is gaining an insurmountable lead in the money race. By the time voters coalesce around a nominee, Democratic operatives worry, it will be too late to overcome Trump’s fundraising advantages in the general election. Already, pro-Trump committees have spent more than $500 million on his reelection — far more than previous incumbents at this point in the election. As a result, more than a dozen groups backed by high-dollar Democratic donors have pledged to spend at least $420 million through the primary season, focused largely on general-election swing states. Their efforts range from running anti-Trump digital ads to funding legal challenges to voter restriction that could hamper Democratic turnout.
New debate threshold squeezes also-rans – Politico: “New thresholds announced by the Democratic National Committee for the sixth debate — which will be hosted by POLITICO and PBS on Dec. 19 in Los Angeles — represent only a modest step up from the criteria for the next debate in November. But they could still seriously endanger the participation of all but the top five candidates. To make the December debate, candidates must hit 4 percent support in at least four DNC-approved polls of primary voters nationally or in early voting states (Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada or South Carolina) — or, instead, they can qualify by hitting 6 percent in two approved early state polls. Candidates must also bring in donations from 200,000 unique donors, with a minimum of 800 donors in 20 states, territories or Washington, D.C. … The new thresholds will put pressure on Democratic candidates outside a top five – Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg and Kamala Harris – who have routinely polled above 4 percent in approved surveys so far.”
Dems try to manipulate moderators – NBC News: “The Democratic National Committee and the news organization Politico are locked in an argument over the ideological credentials of a proposed moderator for next month's Democratic debate… Politico and PBS are scheduled to co-host the sixth Democratic primary debate on Dec. 19 in Los Angeles. At the behest of its publisher, Robert Allbritton, Politico is pushing for Tim Alberta, the chief political correspondent for Politico Magazine… The top PBS journalists under consideration are Judy Woodruff, Yamiche Alcindor and Amna Nawaz. Politico’s decision to push for Alberta has rankled officials at the DNC… The reason: Alberta previously wrote for National Review, a conservative magazine, and has spent the bulk of his recent career chronicling the Republican Party. Democratic Party officials say such a journalist is ill-suited to co-moderate a debate meant to better inform Democratic voters about their potential nominees.”
Sanders hits 4 million donations mark – Fox News: “…[When] it comes to donations to his campaign, the longtime progressive lawmaker and populist champion from Vermont is in a league of his own, far ahead of his 2020 rivals. Sanders’ campaign announced on Tuesday morning that it's now received more than 4 million individual contributions from people across the country, making the senator the fastest candidate in history to reach the fundraising mark. ‘Working-class Americans across the country are chipping in $3, $18, $27, or whatever they can to help elect Bernie Sanders because they know he is the only candidate who will fight for them and take on corporate greed and corruption,’ campaign manager Faiz Shakir touted. ‘This is what momentum looks like.’”

Columbia, S.C. mayor backs Bloomberg – AP: “Before he’s officially a presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is picking up a key endorsement in South Carolina. Steve Benjamin, the mayor of Columbia, told The Associated Press on Monday that he’s ready to back the billionaire if he decides to seek the Democratic presidential nomination. ‘He’s got what it takes and he’s got the resources to take it to Trump,’ Benjamin said in an interview. ‘I believe firmly that Mike Bloomberg can win. I think resources are going to matter.’ First elected in 2010, Benjamin is one of South Carolina’s highest-profile black politicians and was among the candidates to be Hillary Clinton’s running mate in 2016.”
Dems pleased with field, still open to changing horses – NPR: “On the 2020 presidential contest, 69% of Democrats say they're happy with the field. Less than a quarter say they're not. Three-quarters of Democrats also say they still haven't made up their minds on who to vote for, down only 7 points since July, the last time the question was asked in the survey. The survey also asked a battery of candidate qualities that would make a voter most ‘enthusiastic’ to vote for that person. Being a woman is the most desirable quality in a candidate among all registered voters. But there were big differences by party. Democrats would be most ‘enthusiastic’ about voting for a woman, someone who is gay or lesbian, or someone under 40. The top three qualities for Republicans, on the other hand: a business executive, a white man or a woman.”
THE RULEBOOK: HOUSE PARTY
“The number of which the House of Representatives is to consist, forms another and a very interesting point of view, under which this branch of the federal legislature may be contemplated. Scarce any article, indeed, in the whole Constitution seems to be rendered more worthy of attention, by the weight of character and the apparent force of argument with which it has been assailed.” – Alexander Hamilton or James Madison, Federalist No. 55
TIME OUT: SEVEN SCORE AND 16 YEARS AGO
On this day in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered what is probably the finest piece of American political oratory. Speaking for less than three minutes on a sunny fall afternoon in southern Pennsylvania, Lincoln set out the duty of every generation of Americans: “To preserve and prefect the promise of our founding. Those buried at Gettysburg had died in service of that aim. Will we honor their sacrifice by living for it? “It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
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SCOREBOARD
DEMOCRATIC 2020 POWER RANKING
Biden: 27.6 points (no change from last wk.)
Warren: 22.6 points (no change from last wk.)
Sanders: 17.6 points no change from last wk.)
Buttigieg: 7.6 points (no change from last wk.)
Harris: 3.2 points (no change from last wk.)
[Averages include: Monmouth University, NBC News/WSJ, ABC News/WaPo, Fox News and IBD.]
TRUMP JOB PERFORMANCE
Average approval: 43 percent
Average disapproval: 54.4 percent
Net Score: -11.4 percent
Change from one week ago: ↑ 2 points
[Average includes: NPR/PBS/Marist: 44% approve – 51% disapprove; Monmouth University: 45% approve – 52% disapprove; NBC News/WSJ: 45% approve – 53% disapprove; ABC News/WaPo: 39% approve – 59% disapprove; Fox News: 42% approve – 57% disapprove.]
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AS IMPEACHMENT GRINDS ON, VOTERS DIG IN
NPR: “The country is witnessing one of only a handful of times in its history that Congress has gone through with public hearings on whether to impeach a president. And yet, the overwhelming majority of Americans across parties say nothing they hear in the inquiry will change their minds on impeachment, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. Half of Americans said they approve of the impeachment inquiry — about the same as the poll found last month. Respondents are also split on whether they think Trump should be impeached and removed from office. But 65% of Americans say they can't imagine any information or circumstances during the impeachment inquiry where they might change their minds about their position on impeachment. And 30% say yes, it's possible. … ‘We're really not seeing either a backlash or a positive,’ Barbara Carvalho, director of the Marist Poll, said of the impeachment inquiry. ‘What we're seeing is people just locking in.’”
Army colonel testifies about Trump demand – Fox News: “One of the witnesses, Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a National Security Council official, also caused a dustup by acknowledging communications with an unnamed intelligence official during an at-times tense exchange with Republicans. Vindman acknowledged speaking with two people outside the White House about the July 25 call, including State Department official George Kent and the unnamed intelligence community official… Vindman, who reported his concerns about Trump's call to the NSC lawyer, described Trump's request as a ‘demand’ and told lawmakers he believed if Ukraine pursued the investigations, it ‘would be interpreted as a partisan play.’ He also emphasized that he reported his concerns ‘out of a sense of duty.’ Vindman said that since the July 25 phone call, he believes he has been ‘excluded’ from meetings at the White House that would have been appropriate for his position.”
Impeachment scrambles Senate strategies – Politico: “The Senate is increasingly likely to hold Trump’s trial in January, according to senators and aides, a reflection of Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s uncertain timeline in the House and the dismal prospects for finishing an impeachment trial in December .And pushing the trial into 2020 will bring uncertain fallout for both parties, heightening the intrigue of what will already be historic proceedings on the second floor of the Capitol. … Meanwhile, Republican senators will be in the opening of their own primary season for their reelection campaigns, in which special attention will be placed on their fealty to Trump and any whiff of independence during the trial. … Much is uncertain and out of the Senate’s direct control. No one drew up an impeachment inquiry with plans for a Senate trial in January 2020, and there’s no blueprint from past trials to draw from considering none happened in the heat of a campaign.”
CONGRESS KICKS CAN ON SPENDING UNTIL DEC. 20
Politico: “House and Senate leaders secured a deal on Monday afternoon that would extend government funding for four more weeks and sidestep a debilitating government-wide shutdown. The continuing resolution unveiled by House Democrats would last until Dec. 20, leaving out any restrictions on border barrier spending, which President Donald Trump demanded in exchange for his signature. The current stopgap expires Thursday night. The bill would fund a 3.1 percent military pay raise, it would provide extra cash to help the Commerce Department gear up for the 2020 census and it would allow state highway programs to avoid a $7.6 billion cut this summer. It also includes a number of health extenders and renews three expiring surveillance provisions through March. House Democrats, however, did not secure funding for historically black colleges and universities, an item among their requested policy riders.”
Pelosi hopes Trumka can calm freshmen’s jitters – Politico: “Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her top deputies are working to ease long-simmering anxiety among battleground freshmen, which has intensified amid fears that impeachment could creep into 2020 and make many of them one-term members. Pelosi will bring in AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka on Tuesday to speak with freshman Democrats, many of whom have been privately demanding quicker action on President Donald Trump’s trade deal, according to multiple people familiar with the meeting. The private huddle with the labor leader — at a make-or-break moment for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement — is an attempt to calm concerns of swing-district Democrats who fear their agenda isn’t breaking through with the public and are increasingly frustrated by policy stalemates in Washington.”
PLAY-BY-PLAY
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AUDIBLE: AUDIBLE, INDEED
“TOTAL EXONERATION!” – Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif, tweeted after an interview Monday on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” in response to what sounded like him expelling a thunderous toot while on air. The official ‘Hardball’ Twitter account clarified the noise was from someone dragging a coffee mug across a table in the studio.
FROM THE BLEACHERS
“Your snippet from The Atlantic article on The Crown concerning the Queen’s clothing refers to its being, along with her gender, ‘intrinsic to the way she governs.’ No British monarch has governed in well over a hundred years. As the series demonstrates in occasionally painful detail, there are two parts of the British constitution — the efficient and the dignified, represented respectively by the government and the monarch. The monarch functions primarily as the Head of State, a ceremonial position representing the nation’s stability, while the Prime Minister is the Head of Government, subject to the whims of the democratic electorate. In the U.S. both functions are performed by the President, while in parliamentary democracies like India, Austria, Germany, and Israel the President is the ceremonial Head of State.” – Bob Foys, Chicago
[Ed. note: First, Mr. Foys, let’s be clear that this is all Brianna’s fault… I kid, I kid! First, you are quite right about the distribution of duties in a constitutional monarchy. But second, I think we might be a little forgiving when it comes to the political word choices of fashion writers. I’m sure I’d make a terrible hash of clothing terminology if I was delving into the subject to make a political point. I’m more than happy to give the piece’s author, Sophie Gilbert, plenty of leeway in her genuinely interesting, thoughtful piece.]
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THREE WISE GUYS WANTED FOR QUESTIONING
KWCH/AP: “Goddard [Kan.] police say the owners of a camel, cow and donkey found wandering the streets of the Wichita suburb have been located. They say the animals, which looked reminiscent of a ‘nativity scene getaway,’ as some called it, belong to an employee of the nearby Tanganyika Wildlife Park. A neighborhood in Goddard had three unusual visitors strolling through its streets on Sunday afternoon. … ‘Well we were just coming back from picking up a friend and came into the trailer park and the first thing we see is hey there's a cow, wait a minute, that’s a donkey, and that’s a camel and we had all three,’ said Trudy Wilcox. It was quite the sight, a cow, a donkey, and a camel walking through the neighborhood. … With Christmas lights already up on some homes, the three friends brought even more holiday spirit to the neighborhood.”
AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“What does a party do when it runs out of ideas? It can only hope that the other guy has even fewer ideas.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in the Washington Post on Nov. 2, 1990.
Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Original Article