Impeachment stalls until 2020: Hoyer announces no more House votes this year, as Pelosi quotes Shakespeare

closeSen. Lindsey Graham on impeachment delay: Nancy Pelosi has buyer's remorseVideo

Sen. Lindsey Graham on impeachment delay: Nancy Pelosi has buyer's remorse

Democrats are denying President Trump his day in court because 'they know their case sucks,' says South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., announced Thursday afternoon that there will be no more House votes until Jan. 7, prompting cheers from his Democratic colleagues in the chamber.

The announcement is confirmation that the House will not approve impeachment managers or send the two articles of impeachment to the Senate until the beginning of the new year.

The decision has drawn the ire of Republicans, who control the Senate where the trial against Trump — which includes charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — will occur.

MCCARTHY MOCKS PELOSI FOR SHOOTING DOWN IMPEACHMENT QUESTIONS FROM REPORTERS

"It’s beyond me how the Speaker and Democratic Leader in the Senate think withholding the articles of impeachment and not sending them over gives them leverage," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters on Thursday. "Frankly, I’m not anxious to have the trial… If she [House Speaker Nancy Pelosi] thinks her case is so weak she doesn’t want to send it over, throw me into that briar patch."

Articles of impeachment will sit in House until 2020 as lawmakers leave Washington for holiday recessVideo

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., met with McConnell Thursday afternoon and told him that Democrats would like to introduce new witnesses and documents in the next phase of the impeachment process.

“Sen. Schumer asked Sen. McConnell to consider Sen. Schumer’s proposal over the holidays because Sen. Schumer and his caucus believe the witnesses and documents are essential to a fair Senate trial,” Justin Goodman, a spokesman for Schumer, said in a statement.

MCCONNELL: 'IMPASSE' OVER TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, DEMS HAVE 'COLD FEET'

McConnell, in a statement, called the conversation between him and Schumer "cordial" but said that the two parties remain at an "impasse," accusing Schumer of continuing to "demand a new and different set of rules" for the trial.

Pelosi sent a letter to House Democrats late Thursday calling the previous days' vote "an important day for the Constitution of the United States and a somber day for America."

Sen. Mitch McConnell addresses Senate's January scheduleVideo

She also thanked her caucus “for the outstanding moral courage that has been demonstrated, not only yesterday but every day of this prayerful process.”

“We have defended democracy for the people: honoring the vision of our founders for a Republic, the sacrifice of our men and women in uniform to defend it, and the aspirations of our children to live freely within it,” she said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Signaling unity within her party, Pelosi went on to quote the St. Crispin’s Day Speech, from Shakespeare's "Henry V," best known for using the terminology “band of brothers.”

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he today that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother," the quote said in part.

Original Article

Maine Sen. Susan Collins announces reelection campaign ahead of expected Senate trial on Trump

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 18Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 18

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 18 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said Wednesday she'll be seeking reelection, in an announcement ahead of the Senate's expected trial of President Trump.

Collins has maintained she's willing to have an open mind when considering articles of impeachment against the president. The center-leaning senator famously gave a last-minute speech in support of Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court last year ahead of the Senate's narrow vote to confirm the justice.

Although she hasn't publicly weighed in on whether or not she would vote for or against removing the president, Collins repeatedly has defended the whistleblower whose allegations of misconduct by Trump have been central to the investigation into the president's abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

ANDREW MCCARTHY: TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL– WHY IT WILL RESEMBLE A GIANT ROLL OF THE DICE

The last remaining New England Republican in Congress, Collins historically has presented herself as a moderate politician, bucking party-line stances on issues such as abortion and challenging Trump's policies, including building a wall on the southern border between the U.S. and Mexico and withdrawing troops from Syria.

In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is surrounded by reporters as she heads to vote at the Capitol in Washington. Collins officially launched her bid for a reelection Wednesday, Dec. 18, setting up an expensive and closely watched battle for the seat the moderate Republican from Maine has held for nearly 24 years. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is surrounded by reporters as she heads to vote at the Capitol in Washington. Collins officially launched her bid for a reelection Wednesday, Dec. 18, setting up an expensive and closely watched battle for the seat the moderate Republican from Maine has held for nearly 24 years. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Collins detractors from the left have slammed her for supporting Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court, despite a myriad of sexual misconduct allegations against him, as well as advocating for the GOP tax cut.

"The fundamental question I had to ask myself in making my decision was this: In today's polarized political environment, is there still a role for a centrist who believes in getting things done through compromise, collegiality, and bipartisanship?" Collins said in an email, according to reports by NPR. "I have concluded that the answer to this question is 'yes' and I will, therefore, seek the honor of continuing to serve as Maine's United States senator."

Four Democrats are vying for the party’s nomination to face the 67-year-old senator, include activist Betsy Sweet, attorney Bre Kidman, former Google executive Ross LaJeunesse and Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon, who is backed by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Collins has amassed $8.6 million for her reelection bid, the largest haul of any political candidate in Maine history.

The expensive race is projected to cost anywhere between $80 million to $100 million before the 2020 elections, making it the most expensive run the state has ever seen.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

AOC-allied climate group announces ‘insurgent’ House primary challenges against ‘establishment candidates’

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 12Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 12

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 12 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

The Democratic Party can expect to face even more progressive pushback in the 2020 primaries as a prominent climate group on Thursday advanced "insurgent" candidates in order to garner future congressional support for the Green New Deal.

The group, known as the Sunrise Movement, has worked with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., to promote her signature legislation and even joined her in protesting at House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office in 2018.

In a press release, Sunrise offered support for candidates they said were running on the climate plan, which has received the cold shoulder from Democrats like Pelosi. The candidates included Robbert Emmons Jr. for Illinois' first district, Morgan Harper for Ohio's third, Mike Siegel for Texas' 10th, and Marie Newman from Illinois' third.

Sunrise Political Director Evan Weber called out "establishment politicians of both parties" for being complacent on the issue of climate change and indicated voters were looking for a "new way of doing things" in D.C.

CLIMATE ACTIVISTS TURN UP THE HEAT ON ELECTED DEMS, CRITICIZE INACTION

“These insurgent campaigns are a clear indicator of the appetite for an entire new way of doing things, and a restructuring of our society under a populist agenda that guarantees things like living wage jobs, affordable and safe housing, universal clean air and water, and Medicare for All — all policies which we see bundled into the Green New Deal framework," he said.

Emmons Jr. and Harper are looking respectively to target Reps. Joyce Beatty, D-Ill., and Bobby Rush, D-Ill., whom the group says both opposed the Green New Deal.

Ocasio-Cortez previously provoked Rep. Dan Lipinski's ire in September when she endorsed Newman as his successor. Lipinski, D-Ill., is considered a moderate and refused to co-sponsor Ocasio-Cortez's Green New Deal resolution in the House.

AOC NARRATES VIDEO FROM THE FUTURE IN WHICH HER 'GREEN NEW DEAL' SAVES US FROM ENVIRONMENTAL CATASTROPHE

"Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's endorsement of Marie Newman makes crystal clear that Ms.Newman is an extreme candidate," Lipinski said as part of a longer statement. Ocasio-Cortez seemed flabbergasted, suggesting that Lipinski was able to make such strong remarks due to his "corporate" ties.

Earlier this year, Lipinski threw his weight behind a bipartisan carbon tax that came under scrutiny for resembling a plan backed by the Climate Leadership Council, whose founding members included ExxonMobil.

OCASIO-CORTEZ JOINS CLIMATE CHANGE PROTESTERS OUTSIDE PELOSI'S OFFICE DURING FIRST DAY ON CAPITOL HILL

"Lipinski and his dwindling circle of fossil-fuel funded Democrats are a threat to the Democratic Party truly being a party of the people," Newman said in Sunrise's press release.

The endorsements will likely add to the tension over climate change between Democrats and members of the progressive left. Pelosi herself has already staged what appeared to be an insurrection of her own. At a United Nations meeting earlier this month, she seemed to flout the president's decision to leave the controversial Paris Climate Agreement.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Last month, nearly 260 groups sent a letter requesting that Pelosi and Rep. Kathy Castor, D-Fla., pursue policies like the Green New Deal instead of "incremental or isolated policy tweaks."

According to The Washington Post, the group Extinction Rebellion held a hunger strike in an attempt to force the speaker into a video-recorded meeting. When they realized she was planning to leave D.C., the protesters attempted to storm past her office's entrance and into a broader room where her chief of staff sat.

Original Article

Democratic Rep. Denny Heck takes shots at Trump, GOP as he announces retirement plans

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 5Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 5

Fox News Flash top headlines for Dec. 5 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

U.S. Rep. Denny Heck said Wednesday that he’ll retire from Congress when his fourth term ends next year.

The 67-year-old Democrat from Washington state used the announcement as an opportunity to slam President Trump and other Republicans.

In a letter to supporters, Heck – a member of the House Intelligence Committee — said the Russia investigation and the Trump impeachment inquiry have left him discouraged and “rendered my soul weary.”

NEWT GINGRICH: HOUSE REPUBLICANS AND 2020 — RETIREMENTS REALLY MEAN THIS (NOT WHAT YOU THINK)

“I will never understand how some of my colleagues, in many ways good people, could ignore or deny the president’s unrelenting attack on a free press, his vicious character assassination of anyone who disagreed with him, and his demonstrably very distant relationship with the truth,” Heck said.

U.S. Rep. Denny Heck, D-Wash., talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Dec. 3, 2019. (Associated Press)

U.S. Rep. Denny Heck, D-Wash., talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Dec. 3, 2019. (Associated Press)

Heck has represented Washington’s 10th Congressional District, located southwest of Seattle. It encompasses the state capital of Olympia and is considered a Democratic stronghold.

Rep. Dan Newhouse, a Republican from central Washington, said he was proud to have worked with Heck on issues important to the state, including reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank and returning a 9,000-year-old skeleton dubbed “The Ancient One” to local Native American tribes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Born in Vancouver, Wash., Heck was a state lawmaker who was first elected to office at age 24. He later served as chief of staff to then-Gov. Booth Gardner from 1989 to 1993.

Heck has declined to endorse some priorities of progressive Democrats, including the Green New Deal and Medicare for all.

He was expected to face at least one Democratic primary in 2020: Joshua Collins, a 26-year-old truck driver and Democratic Socialist who supports the major points on the progressive agenda.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Original Article

Judiciary Committee announces December impeachment hearing, invites Trump to participate

closeIs censuring President Trump a better option than impeachment for Democrats?Video

Is censuring President Trump a better option than impeachment for Democrats?

The 'Outnumbered' panel debates the optics of the impeachment inquiry heading into the 2020 election.

The House Judiciary Committee is taking over the next phase of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump as Chairman Jerrold Nadler announced plans for a hearing next week to weigh whether the president's actions reach a level of “high crimes and misdemeanors" and warrant articles of impeachment.

Nadler, D-N.Y., penned a letter to the president on Tuesday announcing a hearing for Dec. 4 at 10:00 a.m., and notifying him of the committee’s intentions to provide him with “certain privileges” while they consider "whether to recommend articles of impeachment to the full House.”

TRUMP DEFENDS MOVE TO BLOCK IMPEACHMENT TESTIMONY, SAYS HE IS PROTECTING 'FUTURE PRESIDENTS'

Nadler also extended an invitation to the president, asking whether “you and your counsel plan to attend the hearing or make a request to question the witness panel.”

“If you would like to participate in the hearing, please provide the Committee with notice as soon as possible, but no later than by 6:00 p.m. December 1, 2019,” Nadler wrote. “By that time, I ask that you also indicate who will act as your counsel for these proceedings.”

Democrats consider next moves on impeachment ahead of 2020Video

Nadler added: “I remain committed to ensuring a fair and informative process. To that end, I remind you that participation by the President or his counsel has been described by the Committee in past inquiries as ‘not a right but a privilege or a courtesy which is being extended to the President’s counsel.’”

“I am hopeful that you and your counsel will opt to participate in the Committee’s hearing, consistent with the rules of decorum and with the solemn nature of the work before us,” he continued.

Nadler did warn, however, that if the president and the White House “continue to refuse to make witnesses and documents available to the committees of jurisdiction,” he will “have the discretion to impose appropriate remedies.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Nadler’s letter and invitation to the president comes just one day after House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said he and other committee chairs involved in the impeachment inquiry—Oversight Committee Chair Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., and Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y.,—were “preparing a report summarizing the evidence we have found thus far, which will be transmitted to the Judiciary Committee soon after Congress returns from the Thanksgiving recess.”

It is unclear at this point whether the president will appear or have his counsel participate in the hearing before the Judiciary Committee next week.

Last week, the president blasted the impeachment inquiry altogether, and said: “Frankly, I want a trial.”

At the center of the impeachment inquiry, which began in September, is Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukraine's president. That call prompted a whistleblower complaint to the intelligence community inspector general, and in turn, the impeachment inquiry in the House. Trump challenged the accuracy of the complaint, though the transcript released by the White House did support the core allegations that he pressed for politically related investigations.

The president’s request came after millions in U.S. military aid to Ukraine had been frozen, which Democrats and witnesses have claimed shows a "quid pro quo" arrangement. Trump denies any wrongdoing.

Original Article

George Papadopoulos announces run for Congress on ‘Fox & Friends’

closeGeorge Papadopoulos announces California congressional run on 'Fox & Friends'Video

George Papadopoulos announces California congressional run on 'Fox & Friends'

Former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos reacts to the upcoming IG report and announces his run for Democrat Katie Hill's vacated seat in California.

Former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos, who has famously alleged he was targeted in the FBI’s Russia probe as part of a scheme to take down his boss, announced Monday morning on "Fox & Friends" that he is running for the California congressional seat vacated by Democrat Katie Hill.

“This is a state with tremendous potential. Unfortunately, the governing apparatus and the party in this state has driven it right into the ground,” Papadopoulos said. “I have been living here for over a year and a half, and people every single day, when I go and talk around the districts, the state, the country, they tell me we need a candidate to represent the community that has an America First agenda at heart, that supports the president, and if elected to Congress, would propose and enact legislation that would advance this agenda.”

PAPADOPOULOS: IG REPORT WON'T BE PLEASANT FOR FBI

Papadopoulos had been teasing his candidacy for months, tweeting about it and filing paperwork with the Federal Elections Commission in October.

Papadopoulos was a key figure in the FBI’s Russia probe into ties between Russia and the Donald Trump campaign. That investigation began after revelations that Papadopoulos had learned in 2016 from Maltese professor Joseph Mifsud that Russia had “dirt” on Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the form of thousands of emails.

He then used that connection to try to set up a meeting between Trump, then a Republican presidential candidate, and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and cooperated in Mueller’s investigation. He was sentenced in fall 2018 to 14 days in prison.

Despite his plea, Papadopoulos has suggested he was connected with Mifsud as part of a setup orchestrated by intelligence agencies. His candidacy comes on the heels of the release of his book, "Deep State Target: How I Got Caught in the Crosshairs of the Plot to Bring Down President Trump."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Hill, whose district covers Los Angeles County, announced her resignation in October amid an ethics probe into allegations she had an inappropriate relationship with a congressional staffer and the emergence of embarrassing personal photos.

She’s admitted to a consensual relationship with a campaign staff member, but denied one with her legislative director, which would violate U.S. House rules. She’s also called herself the victim of revenge porn by an abusive husband she's divorcing.

Fox News' Gregg Re and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Biden announces ‘No Malarkey’ Iowa bus tour to boost slumping 2020 campaign

closeVoters agree Biden did not have a good night at the Democrat debateVideo

Voters agree Biden did not have a good night at the Democrat debate

Todd Piro talks to Georgia voters after the Democrats spar on the debate stage amid the impeachment inquiry.

White House hopeful Joe Biden announced an upcoming "No Malarkey" bus tour on Thursday, in an effort to connect with Iowa voters ahead of the nation's first presidential primary.

The eight-day tour is set to cover 18 counties and is designed to help Biden's image, as his Democratic frontrunner status hangs in the balance.

The tour's name is likely derived from his 2012 vice presidential debate against former GOP Rep. Paul Ryan, when he told the Wisconsin Republican that his critique of the Obama administration's foreign policy was, "a bunch of malarkey."

“When Joe Biden first announced he was running, he told Iowans they’d be seeing a lot of him — and he meant it,” Biden campaign manager George Schultz said. “Being honest, upfront and authentic is core to who Joe Biden is and why Iowans love him.”

HUNTER AND JOE BIDEN DID NOTHING ILLEGAL OR UNETHICAL WITH UKRAINE, SAYS DEM SEN. CHRIS MURPHY

The tour is set to begin on Nov. 30 and will include stops in Cedar Rapids, Waterloo, Mason City, Elkader, Decorah, and Oelwein.

Schultz added that "when it comes to protecting health care, rebuilding the middle class, and defeating Donald Trump, Joe will continue laying out a clear vision about how he will deliver results for working families."

More from Media

Biden was mocked on Thursday by former senior Obama adviser David Axelrod during a CNN debate panel. Axelrod said Biden was "Mr. Magooing his way" through the primary.

"Biden, I wouldn’t say that he was a house of fire in any of the debates that we’ve been to. And yet he comes — kind of bumps along, kind of Mr. Magoo-ing his way through this," Axelrod said.

"And you keep worrying he’s going to hit a wall but he’s moving forward.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Iowa Democratic presidential primary is scheduled for February 3, 2020.

Original Article

Castro fails to make cut as DNC announces participants for next debate

closeJulian Castro questions role of Iowa and New Hampshire in primary processVideo

Julian Castro questions role of Iowa and New Hampshire in primary process

Should Iowa and New Hampshire remain the jumping off points for presidential campaigns? Peter Doocy reports.

Ten candidates qualified for next week’s Democratic presidential primary debate, and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro is not one of them.

Castro and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas are two candidates who debated last month who will not appear on the debate stage for the next round next week. Castro failed to meet the threshold requirements set forth by Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez, while O’Rourke dropped out of the race last month.

Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney and author Marianne Williamson also failed to qualify.

This month, candidates were required to have reached 3 percent support in at least four qualifying national polls since Sept. 13 or 5 percent in two early-nominating state polls since that date, while collecting contributions from at least 165,000 unique donors — with at least 600 each in a minimum of 20 states.

CASTRO LAYS OFF STAFF IN NEW HAMPSHIRE AND SOUTH CAROLINA

Some candidates have criticized Perez for what they've viewed as overly stringent requirements. Some argue that the donor emphasis has forced them to spend disproportionately for online fundraising efforts that drain resources they could be using to reach voters in other ways.

Perez says hopefuls have had ample time to demonstrate their supporter, both in polls and through small-dollar contributors, and that any Democrat falling short this far into the campaign almost certainly isn’t positioned to win the nomination or defeat President Trump in November 2020.

Pundits rip Castro for Biden attackVideo

Perez has announced even stiffer requirements for a Dec. 19 debate. The polling marks:4 percent in four national polls or 6 percent in two early state polls taken after Oct. 16. The donor threshold: 200,000 unique donors, with at least 800 from each of 20 states.

The top-tier candidates – former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg — are not threatened by those goals. Sens. Kamala Harris of California and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota have met them as well.

But the higher targets put pressure on several other candidates to broaden their support or risk falling out of any reasonable contention with less than three months to go before the Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Two new candidates also could be vying for December spots.

Deval Patrick, Michael Bloomberg consider making their 2020 White House bidVideo

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick launched his campaign Thursday and filed to appear on New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary ballot. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is considering a bid as well, already having filed paperwork for some Super Tuesday primaries.

Next Wednesday's debate in Atlanta will be broadcast on MSNBC, 9-11 p.m. EST.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Jon Huntsman announces candidacy for Utah governor

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 14Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 14

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 14 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman announced Thursday morning that he is running for his old job once again.

Huntsman left the governorship in the middle of his second term in 2009 to serve as ambassador to China in the Obama administration. He recently finished a two-year stint as ambassador to Russia under President Trump, which ended when he decided to return to Utah last month. (Huntsman had announced his resignation in August.)

JON HUNTSMAN RESIGNS AS AMBASSADOR TO RUSSIA

"We've served our country in the top two diplomatic posts in the world," Huntsman said in a campaign video featuring him and his wife Mary Kaye Huntsman. "Now we feel it is time to give back to our home state. Again."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Huntsman unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination for president in 2012. Earlier in his career, he served as the U.S. Ambassador to Singapore under President George H.W. Bush.

Huntsman joins a crowded field that already includes Utah Lt. Governor Spencer Cox, Salt Lake County Council Chair Aimee Winder-Newton, businessman Jeff Burningham, and Jason Christensen, who has run for various positions in the past.

Original Article

Widow of late Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings announces campaign for husband’s seat

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 11Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 11

Fox News Flash top headlines for Nov. 11 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

The widow of late Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., said on Monday that she will launch a campaign to win her husband’s seat as representative of Maryland’s 7th Congressional District.

Maryland Democratic Party Chairwoman Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, 48, initially told The Baltimore Sun that she would formally announce her campaign on Tuesday, nearly a month after her husband died of cancer on Oct. 17 at age 68.

APRIL RYAN CLASHES WITH ACTOR ISAIAH WASHINGTON OVER GOP CANDIDATE RUNNING FOR CUMMINGS' OLD SEAT

Rep. Elijiah Cummings served nearly two decades in Congress and played an integral role in the early stages of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump as the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

In her first televised interview since her husband’s death, Rockeymoore Cummings said on MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show Monday evening that she and her husband decided about six months ago that she would be the best fit to carry on his legacy and vision for the Baltimore district.

“I have the background and the focus and the commitment and the ability to take the reins and to make a good run for this seat,” Rockeymoore Cummings said. “I fought right alongside Elijah for the last 12 years, and we knew each other another 10 years before that.”

Rockeymoore Cummings also said that the same week she plans to announce her campaign, she will also undergo surgery for a preventative double mastectomy. She said her husband had urged her to undergo the procedure before he died. Her mother died of breast cancer in 2015 and her sister was diagnosed last year.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

“This was scheduled before running for office was ever a consideration before Elijah’s health took a really bad turn for the worse,” she said. “He went with me to the doctor's appointment where I got a consultation about this option and he agreed and begged me several times before he passed away to prioritize myself.”

Rockeymoore Cummings is a public policy consultant who founded the Washington consulting firm Global Policy Solutions LLC and a former 2018 candidate for governor, The Baltimore Sun reported.

Original Article

Pelosi announces House won’t vote now on whether to begin impeachment inquiry

closeTrump defends his Ukraine call as Democrats ramp up impeachment effortsVideo

Trump defends his Ukraine call as Democrats ramp up impeachment efforts

The president's conviction comes as Hunter Biden defends his foreign business dealings; panel reaction and analysis from the 'Special Report' all-star panel.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced after meeting with the House Democratic caucus on Tuesday that there will be no vote — at least for now — on the launch of formal impeachment proceedings against President Trump.

"There's no requirement that we have a vote, and so at this time we will not be having a vote," Pelosi said. "We're not here to call bluffs — we're here to find the truth, to uphold the Constitution of the United States. This is not a game for us. This is deadly serious."

The move was seemingly a boon for moderate Democrats in swing districts, who have been reluctant to have a formal vote in favor of the proceedings as the 2020 elections approach — even as they also have sought to appease liberal constituents by vocally backing the ongoing inquiry.

A congressional aide familiar with House Democrats' discussions told Fox News that many House Democrats did not want to be seen as letting the White House dictate how the House conducted itself. Last week, the White House sent a fiery letter to House Democrats announcing that it would not cooperate with their inquiry, for several reasons — including that, contrary to past precedent, no formal vote had been held on whether to begin impeachment proceedings.

Pelosi ripped those arguments: "They have no substance. They can't defend the president, so they're going to process," she said.

GIULIANI WON'T COMPLY WITH DEMS' SUBPOENA IN IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

Pelosi last month unilaterally held a news conference announcing that such proceedings were in progress. House rules do not require a vote to begin an impeachment inquiry, but it remains unclear whether the courts will agree that an impeachment inquiry has begun without such a vote. If courts do not find that a formal inquiry is in progress, they could curtail Democrats' evidence-gathering efforts.

But Pelosi, on Tuesday, heralded a series of recent court victories by Democrats, including a key win in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals that reaffirmed congressional authority to subpoena several years of Trump's financial records from his accounting firm, Mazars.

"The rulings that we won last week — three of them were against the president's hateful public charge rule from taking effect," Pelosi said, referring to the administration's immigration policy. "A ruling against the president's sham national emergency declaration to build his wasteful border wall. A ruling in the Mazars case led by [House Oversight Committee] Chairman [Elijah] Cummings. … so again, five victories on Friday, one today, in terms of Emoluments."

GOP lawmakers accuse Schiff of 'cherry-picking' what to leak in impeachment inquiryVideo

Separately at the press conference on Tuesday, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., accused the White House of "stonewalling" despite those rulings.

"Were it not for the fact that at least some witnesses have given us documents, we would not know there is a paper record of efforts to condition this meeting, and perhaps condition military support itself, on these political investigations Donald Trump wanted," Schiff said, referring to Trump's fateful July call with Ukraine's leader. "Those documents would have been completely bottled up by the State Department. … The evidence of obstruction of Congress continues to mount."

Schiff said the Office of Management and Budget has refused to provide evidence concerning whether the Trump administration withheld aid to Ukraine, contingent on the country conducting an investigation of Joe and Hunter Biden's business dealings there.

"The Constitution is clear. … the House will have the sole power of impeachment," Schiff said later, when asked why there would be no floor vote on an impeachment inquiry.

WHITE HOUSE UNLOADS ON DEMS, EXPLAINS WHY IT WON'T COOPERATE WITH 'UNCONSTITUTIONAL' IMPEACHMENT PROBE

The White House has strongly suggested it will take the fight over the Democrats' subpoenas to the Supreme Court.

"In the history of our nation, the House of Representatives has never attempted to launch an impeachment inquiry against the president without a majority of the House taking political accountability for that decision by voting to authorize such a dramatic constitutional step," the White House letter to Pelosi and other top Democratic leaders stated.

Activists rally for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., committed Tuesday to launching a formal impeachment inquiry against Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Activists rally for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., committed Tuesday to launching a formal impeachment inquiry against Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

It continued: "Without waiting to see what was actually said on the call, a press conference was held announcing an 'impeachment inquiry' based on falsehoods and misinformation about the call."

Despite Pelosi's claim that there was no “House precedent that the whole House vote before proceeding with an impeachment inquiry,” several previous impeachment inquiries have been launched only by a full vote of the House — including the impeachment proceedings concerning former Presidents Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

White House officials told Fox News the vote opening the proceedings was a small ask, considering the implications of potentially overturning a national election.

Responding to the letter, Pelosi accused Trump of "trying to make lawlessness a virtue" and added, "The American people have already heard the President’s own words – ‘do us a favor, though.’" (That line, from a transcript of Trump's call with Ukraine's leader, in reality referred to Trump's request for Ukraine to assist in an investigation into 2016 election interference, and did not relate to Biden.)

Pelosi continued: "This letter is manifestly wrong, and is simply another unlawful attempt to hide the facts of the Trump Administration’s brazen efforts to pressure foreign powers to intervene in the 2020 elections. … The White House should be warned that continued efforts to hide the truth of the President’s abuse of power from the American people will be regarded as further evidence of obstruction. Mr. President, you are not above the law. You will be held accountable.”

Just before Pelosi took the microphone on Tuesday, a spokesperson for House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office emphasized some of the White House's other objections to Democrats' inquiry.

THE LATEST REPORTING FROM FOX NEWS IN THE TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY AND UKRAINE CONTROVERSY

Separately, the letter asserted multiple alleged violations of the president's due-process rights. It noted that under current impeachment inquiry proceedings, Democrats were not allowing presidential or State Department counsel to be present.

Among the GOP's complaints are that Democrats' procedures did not provide for the "disclosure of all evidence favorable to the president and all evidence bearing on the credibility of witnesses called to testify in the inquiry," according to the White House. And "the right to see all evidence, to present evidence, to call witnesses, to have counsel present at all hearings, to cross-examine all witnesses, to make objections relating to the examination of witnesses or the admissibility of testimony and evidence, and to respond to evidence and testimony" has also been obstructed.

The White House asserted that Democrats also have not permitted Republicans in the minority to issue subpoenas, contradicting the "standard, bipartisan practice in all recent resolutions authorizing presidential impeachment inquiries."

This is a developing story. Check back soon for updates. Fox News' Chad Pergram and Mike Emanuel contributed to this report.

Original Article

Trump announces $50M in aid to Syrian aid groups amid outrage over pullout, Turkish offensive

closeTrump announces 50 million dollars in aid to support Christians and other religious minorities in SyriaVideo

Trump announces 50 million dollars in aid to support Christians and other religious minorities in Syria

The president spoke on the hardships of minority religions in Syria at the Values Vote Summit Dinner.

President Trump announced Saturday that he had authorized the release of $50 million in aid to Syrian human rights groups and other aid organizations in the war-torn country in an apparent attempt to counter criticism of his pullout of U.S. forces there.

“Other presidents would not be doing that, they’d be spending a lot more money but on things that wouldn’t make you happy," Trump said while addressing the Values Voters Summit's Faith, Family and Freedom gala dinner.

"The U.S, condemns the persecution of Christians and we pledge our support to Christians all over,” said Trump, who claimed that under the Obama administration, Christians in Syria had “almost no chance” to immigrate legally to the United States and that Muslim Syrians had a much better shot.

Eric Shawn: UN fears humanitarian 'catastrophe' in SyriaVideo

White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement that the money "will provide emergency financial assistance to Syrian human rights defenders, civil society organizations, and reconciliation efforts directly supporting ethnic and religious minority victims of the conflict.

"It will also go toward increased accountability, removal of explosive remnants of war, community security for stabilization assistance, documenting human rights abuses and international humanitarian law violations, and support for survivors of gender-based violence and torture,” the statement continued.

The U.S. pullout came days before a Turkish push against mostly Kurdish fighters, which the Ankara government has described as a national security threat. The Trump administration has been criticized for abandoning the Kurds, who have been steadfast allies in the five-year-long fight against the ISIS terror group.

ISIS prisoners escape, humanitarian crisis develops in northern SyriaVideo

"Don’t forget they are fighting for their land. They haven’t helped us fighting for our land," Trump told his audience Saturday night. “Let them have their borders, but I don’t think our soldiers should be there for the next 15 years guarding a border between Turkey and Syria when we can’t guard our own borders."

“I said, 'We just spent billions in Iraq and it was the single worst mistake we’ve ever made,'” Trump said, explaining his rationale for pulling U.S. forces out of the area. “We defeated ISIS, we did our job, now we have to go home … You wouldn’t believe how the military-industrial complex came down on me."

Turkey's military said Saturday that it had captured the key Syrian border town Ras al-Ayn, the latest in a series of villages in northern Syria to fall to Turkish troops and allied Syrian opposition fighters.

TRUMP BACKS 'LEGENDARY' GIULIANI AMID REPORTS OF INVESTIGATION INTO POSSIBLE LOBBYING VIOLATIONS

The invasion also has forced nearly 100,000 people to flee their homes amid concerns that ISIS might take advantage of the chaos and try to rise again after its defeat in Syria earlier this year.

The Syrian Democratic Forces, or SDF, said the United States should carry out its "moral responsibilities" and close northern Syrian airspace to Turkish warplanes, but that it didn't want the U.S. to send its soldiers "to the front lines and put their lives in danger."

France's defense and foreign ministries said Saturday that the country was halting exports of any arms to Turkey that could be used in its offensive.

NSC STAFFER DISCUSSED TRUMP-UKRAINE CALL OUTSIDE COUNCIL, CALLED CONVERSATION 'OUTRAGEOUS': SOURCES

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas also announced that Berlin would curtail its arms exports to Turkey. Maas told the weekly Bild am Sonntag that "against the background of the Turkish military offensive in northeastern Syria, the government will not issue any new permissions for any weapons that can be used by Turkey in Syria."

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Friday that Turkey won't stop until the Syrian Kurdish forces withdraw at least 20 miles from the border.

Kurdish news agencies including Hawar and Rudaw said that Hevreen Khalaf, secretary general of the Future Syria Party, was killed Saturday as she was driving on the M-4 highway which connects the towns of Manbij and Qamishli. Rudaw's correspondent blamed Turkish forces for targeting Khalaf's car, and Hawar blamed "Turkey's mercenaries."

The Observatory said six people, including Khalaf, were killed by Turkey-backed opposition fighters on the road that they briefly cut before withdrawing.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In a statement late Saturday, the State Department said it had seen reports of Khalaf's death, as well as those of SDF fighters captured by rival rebel groups allied with Turkey, and found them "extremely troubling."

"We find these reports to be extremely troubling, reflecting the overall destabilization of northeast Syria since the commencement of hostilities on Tuesday," the department said. "We condemn in the strongest of terms any mistreatment and extrajudicial execution of civilians or prisoners, and are looking further into these circumstances."

Fox News' John Roberts and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Trump announces acting Homeland Security Secretary McAleenan to leave post

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 11Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 11

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 11 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan is stepping down from that position, President Trump announced Friday night.

"Kevin now, after many years in Government, wants to spend more time with his family and go to the private sector," Trump tweeted moments before taking the stage at a rally in Lake Charles, La. "Congratulations Kevin, on a job well done!"

The president announced that the new acting homeland security secretary would be announced next week.

This is a developing story; check back for more updates.

Original Article

White House announces it will not comply with ‘illegitimate and unconstitutional’ impeachment inquiry

closeWhite House reportedly planning to step up pushback against Democrats' impeachment inquiryVideo

White House reportedly planning to step up pushback against Democrats' impeachment inquiry

The State Department blocks Amb. Gordon Sondland from testifying in the House impeachment inquiry; reaction and analysis from David Catanese, senior politics writer for US News & World Report, and Fox News contributor Judy Miller, adjunct fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research.

The White House outlined in a defiant eight-page letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and top Democrats on Tuesday why it will not participate in their “illegitimate and unconstitutional” impeachment inquiry, charging that the proceedings have run roughshod over congressional norms and the president's due-process rights.

Trump administration officials called the letter, which was written by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and obtained by Fox News, perhaps the most historic letter the White House has sent. The document tees up a head-on collision with Democrats in Congress, who have fired off a slew of subpoenas in recent days concerning the president's apparent efforts to get Ukraine to investigate political foe Joe Biden.

"President Trump and his administration reject your baseless, unconstitutional efforts to overturn the democratic process," the letter stated. "Your unprecedented actions have left the president with no choice. In order to fulfill his duties to the American people, the Constitution, the Executive Branch, and all future occupants of the Office of the Presidency, President Trump and his administration cannot participate in your partisan and unconstitutional inquiry under these circumstances."

READ THE WHITE HOUSE LETTER

The document concluded: "The president has a country to lead. The American people elected him to do this job, and he remains focused on fulfilling his promises to the American people."

Substantively, the White House first noted in the letter that there has not been a formal vote in the House to open an impeachment inquiry — and that the news conference held by Pelosi last month was insufficient to commence the proceedings.

Why hasn't Nancy Pelosi held a full vote on impeachment?Video

"In the history of our nation, the House of Representatives has never attempted to launch an impeachment inquiry against the president without a majority of the House taking political accountability for that decision by voting to authorize such a dramatic constitutional step," the letter stated.

It continued: "Without waiting to see what was actually said on the call, a press conference was held announcing an 'impeachment inquiry' based on falsehoods and misinformation about the call."

SCHIFF SAYS 'WE' DIDN'T TALK TO WHISTLEBLOWER — THEN BACKTRACKS

Despite Pelosi's claim that there was no “House precedent that the whole House vote before proceeding with an impeachment inquiry,” several previous impeachment inquiries have been launched only by a full vote of the House — including the impeachment proceedings concerning former Presidents Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

White House officials told Fox News the vote opening the proceedings was a small ask, considering the implications of potentially overturning a national election.

The letter went on to note that "information has recently come to light that the whistleblower had contact with [House Intelligence Committee] Chairman [Adam] Schiff's office before filing the complaint," and that Schiff's "initial denial of such contact caused The Washington Post to conclude that Chairman Schiff "clearly made a statement that was false."

The letter added: "In any event, the American people understand that Chairman Schiff cannot covertly assist with the submission of a complaint, mislead the public about his involvement, read a counterfeit version of the call to the American people, and then pretend to sit in judgment as a neutral 'investigator.'"

The letter was dinging Schiff for reciting a fictional version of Trump's call with Ukraine's leader during a congressional hearing. Schiff later called his statements a "parody."

"Perhaps the best evidence that there was no wrongdoing on the call is the fact that, after the actual record of the call was released, Chairman Schiff chose to concoct a false version of the call and to read his made-up transcript to the American people at a public hearing," the letter stated. "The chairman's action only further undermines the public's confidence in the fairness of any inquiry before his committee."

Ukraine's leader has said he felt Trump did nothing improper in their July call, and DOJ lawyers who reviewed the call said they found no laws had been broken. The White House released a transcript of the conversation last month, as well as the whistleblower's complaint, which seemingly relied entirely on second-hand information.

Separately, the letter asserted multiple alleged violations of the president's due-process rights. It noted that under current impeachment inquiry proceedings, Democrats were not allowing presidential or State Department counsel to be present.

Democrats' procedures did not provide for the "disclosure of all evidence favorable to the president and all evidence bearing on the credibility of witnesses called to testify in the inquiry," the letter noted, nor did the procedures afford the president "the right to see all evidence, to present evidence, to call witnesses, to have counsel present at all hearings, to cross-examine all witnesses, to make objections relating to the examination of witnesses or the admissibility of testimony and evidence, and to respond to evidence and testimony."

Democrats also have not permitted Republicans in the minority to issue subpoenas, contradicting the "standard, bipartisan practice in all recent resolutions authorizing presidential impeachment inquiries."

"President Trump and his Administration cannot participate in your partisan and unconstitutional inquiry under these circumstances."

— Pat Cipollone, counsel to President Trump

The letter claimed that House committees have "resorted to threats and intimidation against potential Executive Branch witnesses," by raising the specter of obstruction of justice when administration employees seek to assert "long-established Executive Branch confidentiality interests and privileges in response to a request for a deposition."

"Current and former State Department officials are duty bound to protect the confidentiality interests of the Executive Branch, and the Office of Legal Counsel has also recognized that it is unconstitutional to exclude agency counsel from participating in congressional depositions," the letter stated.

EXCLUSIVE: WHISTLEBLOWER WRITES WH OFFICIAL DESCRIBED TRUMP CALL AS 'FRIGHTENING'

Additionally, the letter noted that Democrats reportedly were planning to interview the whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry at an undisclosed location — contrary, the White House said, to the constitutional notion of being able to confront one's accuser.

According to a White House official, the bottom line was: "We are not participating in your illegitimate exercise. … If you are legitimately conducting oversight, let us know. But all indications are this is about impeachment."

The document came as the White House aggressively has parried Democrats' inquiry efforts. One of the administration's first moves: the State Department on Tuesday barred Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, from appearing before a House panel conducting the probe into Trump.

GOP INTRODUCES RESOLUTION TO KICK PELOSI OUT OF THE HOUSE

"I would love to send Ambassador Sondland, a really good man and great American, to testify, but unfortunately he would be testifying before a totally compromised kangaroo court, where Republican's rights have been taken away, and true facts are not allowed out for the public to see," Trump tweeted.

THE LATEST REPORTING FROM FOX NEWS IN THE TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY AND UKRAINE CONTROVERSY

The strategy risked further provoking Democrats in the impeachment probe, setting up court challenges and the potential for lawmakers to draw up an article of impeachment accusing Trump of obstructing their investigations. Schiff said Sondland's no-show would be grounds for obstruction of justice and could give a preview of what some of the articles of impeachment against Trump would entail.

But, as lawmakers sought to amass ammunition to be used in an impeachment trial, the White House increasingly has signaled that all-out warfare was its best course of action.

"What they did to this country is unthinkable. It's lucky that I'm the president. A lot of people said very few people could handle it. I sort of thrive on it," Trump said Monday at the White House. "You can't impeach a president for doing a great job. This is a scam."

House Democrats, for their part, issued a new round of subpoenas on Monday, this time to Defense Secretary Mark Esper and acting White House budget director Russell Vought. Pelosi's office also released an open letter signed by 90 former national security officials who served in administrations from both parties, voicing support for the whistleblower who raised concerns about Trump's efforts to get Ukraine to look into Biden's business dealings in Ukraine.

Speaker Pelosi signals support for Jerry Nadler's resolution on impeachment proceedingsVideo

"A responsible whistleblower makes all Americans safer by ensuring that serious wrongdoing can be investigated and addressed, thus advancing the cause of national security to which we have devoted our careers," they wrote. "Whatever one's view of the matters discussed in the whistleblower's complaint, all Americans should be united in demanding that all branches of our government and all outlets of our media protect this whistleblower and his or her identity. Simply put, he or she has done what our law demands; now he or she deserves our protection."

The House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs Committees were investigating Trump's actions alleging he pressured Ukraine to investigate Biden and his son, potentially interfering in the 2020 election. The former vice president, for his part, has accused Trump of "frantically pushing flat-out lies, debunked conspiracy theories and smears against me." And, Biden's campaign has sought to have Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani, who has accused Biden of possible corruption, removed from the airwaves.

PROOF OF LINKS: PHOTO OBTAINED BY FOX NEWS SHOWS BIDEN GOLFING WITH UKRAINE EXEC

Biden has acknowledged on camera that in spring 2016, when he was vice president and spearheading the Obama administration's Ukraine policy, he successfully pressured Ukraine to fire top prosecutor Viktor Shokin. At the time, Shokin was investigating Burisma Holdings — where Hunter had a lucrative role on the board despite limited relevant expertise. Critics have suggested Hunter Biden's salary bought access to Biden.

The vice president threatened to withhold $1 billion in critical U.S. aid if Shokin, who was widely accused of corruption, was not fired.

"Well, son of a b—h, he got fired," Biden joked at a panel two years after leaving office.

Fox News' Catherine Herridge and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Turkey announces incursion of northeast Syria, US-backed Kurds have vowed ‘all-out’ war

closePentagon warns of ISIS resurgence in SyriaVideo

Pentagon warns of ISIS resurgence in Syria

ISIS resurgence in Syria after U.S. troop cuts; Lucas Tomlinson reports.

The White House announced late Sunday that Turkey will soon move forward with its planned military operation in northeast Syria in an area where U.S. troops have been deployed and operating with Kurdish-led forces.

The U.S. will not be involved in the operation, the White House said. President Trump spoke with Turkey’s President Tayyip Erdogan by telephone. U.S. troops will be moved from the area.

"The United States will not hold them for what could be many years and great cost to the United States taxpayer," the statement read. "Turkey will now be responsible for all ISIS fighters in the area captured over the past two years in the wake of the territorial “Caliphate” by the United States."

ERDOGAN THREATENS ACTION

Erdogan said his country has given enough warning and have “acted with enough patience.” Erdogan has expressed frustration with Washington’s support for Kurdish groups in Syria.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces said it is committed to the agreement between Turkey and the U.S. to preserve stability in the region.

CLICK HERE FOR THE NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

"However, we will not hesitate to turn any unprovoked attack by Turkey into an all-out war on the entire border to DEFEND ourselves and our people," SDF spokesman Mustafa Bali tweeted a day earlier.

Trump threatens to 'decimate' Turkey's economy if they go after Kurds in SyriaVideo

Many took to social media to criticize the White House's decision and said the U.S. is essentially abandoning the Kurds.

KURDS SHOCKED BY US TROOP WITHDRAWAL

Turkey views the People's Protection Units, or YPG, as an extension of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, which has waged an insurgency against Turkey for 35 years.

Ankara and Washington consider the PKK a terror group but they diverge on the issue of the YPG, which forms the core of U.S.-backed Syrian forces against ISIS and is loosely linked with the SDF.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Original Article

HHS announces where millions in Title X money going after Planned Parenthood abandons grants over abortion

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 1Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 1

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 1 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

The Health and Human Services Department announced Monday where millions of dollars in family planning grants would go after Planned Parenthood and others severed them due to a rule blocking funding for facilities where abortion is a "method of family planning."

Totaling $33.6 million, the money went towards health departments and clinics across a long list of states as part of HHS's effort to close the gap created by organizations that severed Title X funding. In a press release, the department said the awarded grants prioritized "unserved and underserved jurisdictions and low-income individuals."

"In order to minimize the service gaps created by those grantees, HHS awarded supplemental grants to qualified organizations that comply with the law," HHS Director of External Affairs Mia Heck said in a statement to Fox News.

"Those supplemental grants allow them to expand family-planning services and increase protections for women and children at risk of (or victims of) child abuse, child molestation, sexual abuse, rape, incest, intimate-partner violence, and sex trafficking."

PLANNED PARENTHOOD ABANDONS TITLE X FEDERAL FUNDS AFTER TRUMP RULE PROHIBITS ABORTION REFERRALS

Planned Parenthood affiliates represented at least eight of the providers whose funding was transferred by HHS. The others included government health departments in New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, Illinois, Vermont, and Oregon. Those organizations presumably refused to budge on abortion, as the rule blocked funding for facilities that referred people for abortion. It also required a "physical and financial separation of Title X and non-Title X activities."

The announcement came as Planned Parenthood fought the Trump administration over the issue. "Those grantees have since made clear that they would not fulfill their commitments to serve their patients through the Title X program," Heck told Fox News. "Instead, they have chosen to prioritize referrals for abortion over providing services for clients who need federally funded, family-planning services."

That statement echoed those of pro-life advocates who argued that Planned Parenthood and others preferred to continue providing abortions than receive funding for other services. States like Alabama, Arizona, Mississippi, and Delaware were among those which received the additional Title X money.

NANCY PELOSI SAYS ABORTION BANS 'IGNORE BASIC MORALITY'

Planned Parenthood and others have argued that the administration's rule was an attack on women's health care and would risk health care access for millions of people.

"This puts health care at risk for four million patients and keeps patients from getting information about all of their health care options — including 1.6 million Planned Parenthood patients," the group said on its website.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

While it's unclear what would happen to Planned Parenthood's patients, HHS maintained that the new grants would help "minimize the service gaps" created by the previous grantees.

"The supplemental awards will come close to—if not exceed—prior Title X patient coverage," Heck said. "HHS will continue to seek qualified entities to minimize any interruption of Title X services caused by the grantees that chose not to serve their patients as promised when they accepted Title X funds."

Original Article

Mac Thornberry, top GOP lawmaker on Armed Services, announces retirement

closeFox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 30Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 30

Fox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 30 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

The influential Rep. Mac Thornberry on Monday announced plans leave Congress, becoming the sixth Republican lawmaker from Texas to retire this cycle while opening yet another seat in the traditionally-Republican state that's become more purple in recent years.

Thornberry, the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, said he will not seek reelection in 2020 following 25 years representing the state's 13th Congressional District. Thornberry represents a safe GOP district and won in 2018 with more than 81 percent of the vote.

NEWT GINGRICH: HOUSE REPUBLICANS AND 2020 — RETIREMENTS REALLY MEAN THIS (NOT WHAT YOU THINK)

"It has been a great honor to serve the people of the 13th District of Texas as their congressman for the last 25 years," Thornberry said in a news release. "They have given me opportunities to serve the nation in ways I could have never imagined."

FILE - In this April 26, 2017, file photo House Armed Services Committee Chairman Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

FILE – In this April 26, 2017, file photo House Armed Services Committee Chairman Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Rep. Bill Flores, R-Texas, became the fifth Republican from the state to announce he will retire earlier this month. Thornberry is the 19th House Republican leaving Congress. That includes two members who have resigned and are already gone.

At least three of the retiring Texas Republicans are vacating seats that Democrats could win, largely in suburban districts where an aversion to President Donald Trump among educated women is weakening the GOP.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

"With over a year to go, I will continue to represent the people of the 13th District to the best of my ability," Thornberry said of the rest of his term.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Original Article

Pentagon announces more US troops, but ‘not thousands’ more, will deploy to Mideast

close President Trump says US has plenty of options to respond to Saudi oil attack Video

President Trump says US has plenty of options to respond to Saudi oil attack

The White House weighs its options as Iran warns that a military response could trigger an 'all-out war'; chief White House correspondent John Roberts reports.

The U.S. will deploy more troops to the Middle East to deter Iran's increasingly aggressive behavior in the region, top military officials said Friday night.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper announced the deployment to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates would be “defensive” in nature. He did not offer specific numbers or say precisely when they'd go, but he did say the deployment would consist of air and missile defense units.

When asked how many troops were going overseas, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford said “not thousands,” and added there had been “no decision on specific units.”

Esper said the deployment was a first step toward addressing Iran's increasingly violent acts in the region — including last weeks' drone attack on Saudi Arabian oil facilities — and he called on other nations to step up and condemn the attacks.

This Saturday, Sept. 14 satellite image from Planet Labs Inc. shows thick black smoke rising from Saudi Aramco's Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq, Saudi Arabia. (Planet Labs Inc via AP)

This Saturday, Sept. 14 satellite image from Planet Labs Inc. shows thick black smoke rising from Saudi Aramco's Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq, Saudi Arabia. (Planet Labs Inc via AP)

Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen claimed responsibility for the Sept. 14 attack on the world's largest oil processing plant and a major oil field, but the U.S. and Saudi Arabia blamed Iran directly. Iran has denied involvement in the attack.

“It is clear […] that the weapons used were Iranian-produced and were not launched from Yemen,” Esper said Friday. He and Dunford gave an unscheduled press conference after meeting with President Trump earlier in the day.

All signs indicate “Iran was responsible for the attack,” Esper said.

“The U.S. does not seek conflict with Iran,” he noted. “That said, we have many other military options available if necessary.”

IRAN WARNS OF ‘ALL-OUT WAR’ IF US RETALIATES IN WAKE OF SAUDI OIL FACILITY BOMBINGS

Officials said the U.S. urges Iran to immediately cease its aggressive and destabilizing activities in the region and noted Saudi Arabia has “full U.S. commitment” to help defend Saudi Arabia and its oil infrastructure, they noted.

Defense officials told Fox News on Thursday that the Trump administration was weighing the option to send more troops to the Middle East.

“We have a robust presence in the Gulf already,” Esper said. “We feel quite confident in terms of our own defense posture and the ability to do anything else as necessary.”

There are currently 70,000 service members stationed in the region.

President Trump orders new sanctions on Iran following Saudi oil attack Video

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned on Thursday that there could be an "all-out war” that would cause “a lot of casualties” if Tehran is attacked in retaliation for the bombings of Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities.

"I am making a very serious statement that we don't want to engage in a military confrontation," Zarif told CNN. "But we won't blink to defend our territory."

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had tweeted a day before that the “Iranian regime's threatening behavior will not be tolerated,” calling the bombings an “act of war.”

POMPEO ACCUSES IRAN OF ‘UNPRECEDENTED ATTACK’ AFTER DRONES HIT SAUDI OIL FACILITIES

Trump said earlier this week it was “looking like” Iran was responsible for the attack but stopped short of directly accusing Tehran.

The Saudis on Wednesday displayed what they said were Iranian weapons collected after the attack and showed video footage of what was said to be a drone coming in from the north. However, Yemen – where the Houthi rebels are located – is south of the kingdom.

Saudi Arabia claims evidence proves Iran was behind oil plant attack Video

A Saudi military official said 18 drones and seven cruise missiles were launched, with three missiles failing to hit their targets. The missiles were said to have a range of 435 miles, which weapons experts told The Associated Press indicated they could not have been fired from Yemen.

Read morePentagon announces more US troops, but ‘not thousands’ more, will deploy to Mideast

GOP buys JonOssoff.com as Dem star announces another congressional bid

close Fox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 10 Video

Fox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 10

Fox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 10 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com

Before they announce that they're running for Congress, most candidates ensure they've locked up the rights to relevant Internet domain names.

But after it emerged late Monday that former Democratic House candidate Jon Ossoff, 32, would challenge Republican Sen. David Perdue in 2020, it also became clear that his campaign hadn't done so at all.

Indeed, the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) has purchased www.JonOssoff.com. Now, visitors are redirected to an article in The Washington Examiner titled, "Jon Ossoff, top Democratic congressional candidate, raises questions with misleading resume."

The NRSC said it would continue to maintain the website throughout Ossoff's run.

“JonOssoff.com will have all the details about Jon Ossoff’s resume," National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Nathan Brand told Fox News. "Since Ossoff is a serial resume inflator, voters will need a good source for all the news about Ossoff’s misleading claims and left-wing views.”

Jon Ossoff, pictured, will challenge Republican U.S. Sen. David Perdue in 2020, the Democrat tweeted Monday night. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Jon Ossoff, pictured, will challenge Republican U.S. Sen. David Perdue in 2020, the Democrat tweeted Monday night. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Cybersquatting laws, which prevent entities from buying up trademarked domain names in bad faith, do not generally apply to the purchase of domain names that include the non-trademarked names of popular figures.

Ossoff rose to prominence two years ago riding a wave of dissatisfaction with Washington, and his campaign for Georgia's 6th Congressional District was backed nationally by enthusiastic supporters, even though he lived outside the district.

TRUMP TAUNTS DEM CANDIDATE IN GEORGIA ELECTION

Ossoff raised roughly $30 million in the 2017 special election for the seat but lost to Republican Karen Handel.

Ossoff turned heads by claiming in an advertisement that he had been a national security aide with a "top-secret clearance."

"I've got five years of experience as a national security staffer in the U.S. Congress," Ossoff said. "I held top-secret security clearance."

Georgia Republican Sen. David Perdue, left, has emerged as a close Trump ally.

Georgia Republican Sen. David Perdue, left, has emerged as a close Trump ally. (AP)

One of his campaign ads boasted that “as a national security aide with top-secret clearance, Jon Ossoff saw waste and abuse by military contractors and sought to stop it."

The Washington Post's fact-checker, Glenn Kessler, rated Ossoff's claims misleading, noting that Ossoff did not actually hold a top-secret clearance for the whole five years that he worked in Congress. Instead, he held the clearance for five months.

"Moreover, declaring himself a 'senior national security staffer' is also bit too much résumé puffery," Kessler observed. "Ossoff did not even work on the staff of a major committee, such as Armed Services or International Relations. Instead, he was an aide to a relatively low-ranking member of Congress."

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution also reported that the Ossoff campaign had claimed that the candidate received the security clearance after the 2006 election, only to reveal under pressure that he received the clearance in March 2012.

Despite the past disappointments and bluster, Ossoff, the fourth Georgia Democrat to join the race that could help determine control of the Senate, confidently announced his bid Monday night during an appearance on "The Last Word" on MSNBC.

"I'm running because we face a crisis of political corruption in this country," Ossoff told host Lawrence O'Donnell, calling Perdue a "caricature of Washington corruption."

Ossoff cited Congress' failure to take up gun control legislation and political influence at scientific institutions as examples of corruption.

Perdue, a former Fortune 500 company chief executive, has emerged as a close ally of President Trump after being elected in 2014.

Read moreGOP buys JonOssoff.com as Dem star announces another congressional bid

Mark Sanford announces Trump primary challenge: GOP ‘has lost our way’

close Mark Sanford on possible primary challenge to President Trump Video

Mark Sanford on possible primary challenge to President Trump

Former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford joins Chris Wallace on 'Fox News Sunday.'

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford announced Sunday that he is running for president as a Republican, becoming the latest to challenge President Trump in the GOP primaries.

Sanford said the Republican Party is facing an identity crisis, and he wants the GOP to take a look at itself and do some soul searching.

FLASHBACK: SANFORD, MULLING GOP PRIMARY BID IN 2020, CONFESSES: 'I DON'T THINK ANYBODY'S GOING TO BEAT DONALD TRUMP'

"I think we have to have a conversation about what it means to be a Republican," Sanford told "Fox News Sunday," claiming the party "has lost our way."

Sanford specifically made reference to the debt, deficit and government spending. Other conservatives expressed concern about these issues when Trump helped Congress pass a spending bill that increases spending caps and suspends the debt ceiling, allowing for more government borrowing until July 31, 2021. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., blasted his colleagues at the time, saying it "marks the death of the Tea Party movement in America."

Sanford also challenged Trump's tactics when it comes to trade, saying that engaging the world when it comes to trade is "one of the hallmarks of the Republican Party."

He also brought up political culture, which he said has been "damaged" by Trump.

"We need to have a conversation about humility," Sanford said, blasting Trump's social media habits by claiming that a tweet "is not leadership."

Earlier this summer, when Sanford was still deciding whether to run, he admitted, "I don’t think anybody’s going to beat Donald Trump."

When pressed on why he is running a race that he knows he will likely lose, Sanford said, "this is the beginning of a long walk, but it begins with a first step.”

SEVERAL STATE GOP PARTIES COULD SCRAP PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES, INFURIATING POTENTIAL TRUMP CHALLENGERS

Host Chris Wallace grilled Sanford on his own controversies, which include a stretch of nearly a week in 2009 during his term as governor, when he disappeared only to eventually admit that he was in Argentina having an extramarital affair. At the time, his spokesperson said Sanford was hiking the Appalachian Trail.

Sanford said he "profoundly apologized for that," contrasting his remorse with Trump, who he said does not apologize for anything. Trump poked fun at Sanford after his scandal was brought to light, but Sanford insisted that his campaign against the president was not personal.

Sanford is now the third Republican to announce a run against Trump in the primaries, with former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld and former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh previously announcing their campaigns.

After Weld and Walsh stated they were running against Trump, Politico reported that the Republican parties of Arizona, Kansas, Nevada and South Carolina were looking to scrap their primaries and caucuses.

"Trump and his allies and the Republican National Committee are doing whatever they can do to eliminate primaries in certain states and make it very difficult for primary challengers to get on the ballot in a number of states,” Walsh told Politico. Weld reacted by tweeting, "Donald Trump, by turns arrogant and paranoid, has made no secret of the fact that he wishes to be crowned as president rather than elected. That might be fine in a monarchy, but we overthrew ours two centuries ago."

Kansas Republican Party Executive Director Shannon Golden, meanwhile, defended the decision, telling Fox News that the state never has Republican primaries when there is a GOP incumbent.

Fox News' Paul Steinhauser and Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Original Article